Shrek spoofs

Shrek spoofs DEFAULT

In 2001, Shrek was a massive box-office success, a breakthrough for computer-generated animation, and eventually, the Academy Awards’ first winner for Best Animated feature. In 2021, it is a grotesque glob of silly putty for the unhinged minds of Tumblr, 4chan, and Reddit to stretch into punch-drunk absurdity.

When did Shrek cross the meme threshold? Tracing the ogre’s mud tracks back in time brings us to 2013, when a 4chan user wrote a disturbing greentext story in which Shrek does some … ugly sex stuff. The goal was clearly to create the most gruesome remix of a kids’ movie possible. That’s also how the very NSFW video “Shrek is love, Shrek is life” was burped into existence, and somehow, entered the “normie” circles of the internet as though it were Shrek himself scaling Princess Fiona’s tower.

Over time, as Shrek memes oozed off 4chan onto less sinister internet pastures, the jokes became more wholesome and silly. The internet meme regime blessed us with creations like “Shrek but every time he takes a STEP it gets 5% faster,” a masterclass in the art of iMovie that has over 30 million views on YouTube. In 2018, over 200 artists came together to create a fan-made recreation of the entire 90-minute movie. To quote Smash Mouth’s “All Star” — which the internet also reprocessed, since it was used in the Shrek opening credits — the memes start comin’ and they don’t stop comin’.

But why Shrek? As Donkey tells his grumpy companion, “You got that on-I-don’t-care-what-nobody-thinks-of-me thing. I like that.” Even years after its release, audiences still appreciated Shrek’s status as the smelliest fairy tale hero of all time. Like so much meme fodder, the creators of the movie made it easy, even down to the pixels that sculpted Shrek’s viridescent physique.

Dreamworks Animation came into the world of 3D CG looking like an off-brand version of Disney or Pixar. In 1998, Dreamworks and Pixar released Antz and A Bug’s Life, respectively, with the former receiving dismal reviews. So, Dreamworks animators were instructed to make Shrek10-times better than Antz, and they dreamed big (and weird) to do so. The animators even poured mud on themselves to better understand how to animate Shrek’s swampy surroundings.

The entire concept of the first Shrek seems to nod to Dreamworks’ scruffy status – the franchise continuously spoofs the tired Disney tropes of a prince and princess living happily ever after. According to The Men Who Would Be King, Nicole LaPorte’s 2010 book about Dreamworks, animators who underperformed on more serious films like The Prince of Egypt were reassigned on this upside-down fairy tale. They called this getting “Shreked.” Surprisingly, the team who brought characters like Donkey and Lord Farquaad to life had the last laugh. In 2001, Disney’s Atlantis: The Lost Empire only made $186.1 million at the box office, compared with Shrek’s $484.4 million.

Shrek was like the public domain fairy tale version of The Avengers, but when boards like Shrekchan were established in 2010 by fans that knighted themselves “Brogres,” the movie was treated like a public domain entity in itself. By 2012, a hobbyist animation program called Source Filmmaker (SFM) entered an open beta, allowing meme aficionados to craft off-kilter, esoteric new adventures for the ogre they worshipped. Masterpieces of the form include Shrek Gets Spooked, a Goosebumps spoof; Shrek It Ralph, a re-creation of Disney’s Wreck-It-Ralph featuring Shrek; and Shrek’s Day Out, a lightning-paced romp through Shrek’s absurdist world, including visits to Shrekway and Waffle Shrek that has almost 27 million views.

Image: Dreamworks Animation

Dreamworks’ animation may have been cutting-edge in 2001, but over a decade later, the more artistically-savvy Brogres could craft their own downloadable assets of characters and scenes from Shrek that anyone with SFM could adapt. Much like Pepe the Frog, who started as a character in Matt Furie’s slacker comedy comic Boy’s Club and went through so much meme appropriation that by 2016 was declared a hate symbol by the Anti-Defamation League, Shrek’s nascent 3D animation form was malleable. The more easily adaptable a character is, the further it can sink into the internet swamp, absorbing the muddy, digital detritus until it rises to the surface of meme culture, gasping for air.

Shrek hasn’t suffered the same horrific fate as Pepe, but the two viral creatures share some other key similarities: They both come from self-satirizing source media (Boy’s Club riffed on a group of animal friends figuring it out post-college), and they’re both easy to recreate. When Pepe began appearing on alt-right merchandise, Furie took legal action to snuff out any off-brand appearance. But despite how contorted they’ve become, Shrek memes have proliferated without much legal pushback. Dreamworks has issued DMCA takedowns of Shrek meme content through content scrapers on sites like YouTube, but poor fan re-drawings and SFM animations are rarely pegged as violations by the copyright robot brigade.

Dreamworks might be entitled to slapping Shrek memes with copyright infringement, but why lose the free advertising? The proliferation of Shrek content is what makes the film still relevant 20 years later. Plus, to put it simply, copyright law leaves some wiggle room for parodies or spoofs of copyrighted content. For memes like “Watch at 0.25x for the entire Shrek movie,” which upload a downloaded, probably illegal version of Shrek, the swampy waters get foggier. But as a YouTube commenter says,“Is it legal? Probably not. Do we care? Ofcourse [sic] not it’s frickin Shrek.”

To this day, the four installments in the Shrek franchise remain Dreamworks’ four highest-grossing films. This lasting relevance of Shrek in pop culture incentivizes production companies to let their property be adapted and iterated upon by fans. Even Disney has started to come around, realizing that the best way for an animated film to remain relevant is for it to become a meme. Would Disney have let Ratatouille: The Musical fly if it weren’t for Shrek? Probably not.

Sours: https://www.polygon.com/22434541/shrek-memes

Shrek

2001 animated film directed by Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson

This article is about the first Shrek film. For the franchise, see Shrek (franchise). For the title character, see Shrek (character). For other uses, see Shrek (disambiguation).

Shrek is a 2001 American computer-animated fantasycomedy film loosely based on the 1990 fairy tale picture book of the same name by William Steig. Directed by Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson in their directorial debuts, it stars Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, and John Lithgow as the voices of the lead characters. The film parodies other fairy tale adaptations, primarily aimed at animated Disney films.[6] In the story, an ogre called Shrek (Myers) finds his swamp overrun by fairy tale creatures who have been banished by the corrupt Lord Farquaad (Lithgow) aspiring to be king. Shrek makes a deal with Farquaad to regain control of his swamp in return for rescuing Princess Fiona (Diaz), whom Farquaad intends to marry. With the help of Donkey (Murphy), Shrek embarks on his quest but soon falls in love with the princess, who is hiding a secret that will change his life forever.

After purchasing the rights to Steig's book in 1991, Steven Spielberg planned to produce a traditionally-animated film based on the book, but John H. Williams convinced him to bring the project to the newly founded DreamWorks in 1994. Jeffrey Katzenberg began active development of the film in 1995 immediately following the studio's purchase of the rights from Spielberg. Chris Farley was originally cast as the voice for the title character, recording nearly all of the required dialogue. After Farley died in 1997 before his work on the film was finished, Mike Myers was hired to voice the character, eventually settling on giving Shrek a Scottish accent. The film was initially intended to be created using motion capture, but after poor test results, the studio hired Pacific Data Images to complete the final computer animation.

Shrek premiered at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival, where it competed for the Palme d'Or,[7] making it the first animated film since Disney's Peter Pan (1953) to be chosen to do so.[8] The film was widely praised by critics for its animation, voice performances, writing and humor, which critics noted simultaneously catered to both adults and children. The film was theatrically released in the United States on May 18, 2001, and grossed $484 million worldwide against a production budget of $60 million, becoming the fourth highest-grossing film of 2001. Shrek won the first ever Academy Award for Best Animated Feature and was also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay. It earned six award nominations from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), ultimately winning Best Adapted Screenplay. The film's success helped establish DreamWorks Animation as a prime competitor to Pixar in feature film computer animation, and three sequels were released—Shrek 2 (2004), Shrek the Third (2007), and Shrek Forever After (2010)—along with two holiday specials, a spin-off film, and a stage musical that kickstarted the Shrek franchise. Although plans for a fifth film were canceled prior to the fourth film's release, the project was revived in 2016, but has since stalled, with production and a potential release date getting pushed back.

Deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the United States Library of Congress, Shrek was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry in 2020.

Plot

Shrek is an anti-social and highly-territorial green ogre who loves the solitude of his swamp. His life is interrupted after the dwarfish Lord Farquaad of Duloc unknowingly exiles a vast number of fairy-tale creatures to Shrek's swamp. Angered by the intrusion, he decides to visit Farquaad and demand they be moved elsewhere. He reluctantly allows the talkative Donkey, who was exiled as well, to tag along and guide him to Duloc.

Meanwhile, Farquaad is presented with Snow White's Magic Mirror, who tells him that in order to become a true king, he must marry a princess. Farquaad chooses Princess Fiona, who is imprisoned in a castle tower guarded by a dragon. Unwilling to perform the task himself, he organizes a tournament in which the winner will receive the "privilege" of rescuing Fiona. Shrek and Donkey arrive during the tournament and defeat Farquaad's knights. Farquaad proclaims them champions and demands that they rescue Fiona. Shrek negotiates to have the fairytale creatures relocated if he succeeds, and Farquaad accepts.

Shrek and Donkey travel to the castle and are attacked by Dragon. Shrek locates Fiona, who is appalled by his lack of romanticism, and they flee the castle after rescuing Donkey. When Shrek removes his helmet revealing he is an ogre, Fiona stubbornly refuses to go to Duloc demanding Farquaad arrive in person, but Shrek carries her against her will. That night, after setting up camp and with Fiona alone in a cave, Shrek confides in Donkey about his frustration with being feared and rejected by others over his appearance. Fiona overhears and decides to be kind to Shrek. The next day, they encounter Robin Hood and his band of Merry Men, and Fiona dispatches them easily with martial arts when they attack. Shrek is impressed with Fiona, and they begin to fall in love.

When the trio nears Duloc, Fiona takes shelter in a windmill for the evening. Donkey later enters alone and discovers that Fiona has transformed into an ogress. She explains she has been cursed since childhood, forced to transform every night after sunset and changing back at sunrise. She tells Donkey that only "true love's kiss" will break the spell and change her to "love's true form". Meanwhile, Shrek is about to confess his feelings to Fiona, when he overhears the conversation as she is calling herself an "ugly beast". Believing that Fiona is talking about him, Shrek angrily leaves and returns the next morning with Lord Farquaad. Confused and hurt by Shrek's abrupt hostility toward her, Fiona accepts Farquaad's marriage proposal and requests they be married before nightfall.

Shrek abandons Donkey and returns to his now-vacated swamp, but realizes that despite his privacy, he feels miserable and misses Fiona. Donkey arrives at the swamp and confronts Shrek. During their quarrel, Donkey explains that the "ugly beast" Fiona was referring to was someone else, and urges him to express his feelings for Fiona before she marries, and the two quickly travel to Duloc thanks to Dragon who Donkey had befriended earlier. Shrek interrupts the wedding just before the ceremony completes and tells Fiona that Farquaad is only marrying her to become king. The sun sets as Fiona transforms into an ogress in front of everyone, causing a surprised Shrek to understand what he overheard.

Outraged, Farquaad orders Shrek executed and Fiona detained. Dragon, alongside Donkey, bursts in and devours Farquaad. Shrek and Fiona profess their love and share a kiss. Fiona's curse is broken, but permanently making her an ogress, the form that she wasn't expecting, but Shrek still finds her beautiful. They marry in the swamp with fairy-tale creatures in attendance, then leave for their honeymoon.

Voice cast

Main article: List of Shrek characters

Production

Development

At the time DreamWorks was founded, producer John H. Williams got hold of the book from his children and when he brought it to DreamWorks, it caught Jeffrey Katzenberg's attention and the studio decided to make it into a film.[16] Recounting the inspiration of making the film, Williams said:

Every development deal starts with a pitch and my pitch came from my then kindergartner, in collaboration with his pre-school brother. Upon our second reading of Shrek, the kindergartner started quoting large segments of the book pretending he could read them. Even as an adult, I thought Shrek was outrageous, irreverent, iconoclastic, gross, and just a lot of fun. He was a great movie character in search of a movie.[17]

After buying the rights to the film, Katzenberg quickly put it in active development in November 1995.[18][19] Steven Spielberg had thought about making a traditionally animated film adaption of the book before, when he bought the rights to the book in 1991 before the founding of DreamWorks, where Bill Murray would play Shrek and Steve Martin would play Donkey.[20] In the beginning of production, co-director Andrew Adamson refused to be intimidated by Katzenberg and had an argument with him how much should the film appeal to adults. Katzenberg wanted both audiences, but he deemed some of Adamson's ideas, such as adding sexual jokes and Guns N' Roses music to the soundtrack, to be too outrageous.[21][22] Adamson and Kelly Asbury joined in 1997 to co-direct the film. However, Asbury left a year later for work on the 2002 film Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, and was replaced with story artist Vicky Jenson. Both Adamson and Jenson decided to work on the film in half, so the crew could at least know whom to go to with specific detail questions about the film's sequences; "We both ended up doing a lot of everything," Adamson said. "We're both kinda control freaks, and we both wanted to do everything."

Some early sketches of Shrek's house were done between 1996 and 1997 using Photoshop, with the sketches showing Shrek first living in a garbage dump near a human village called Wart Creek. It was also thought one time that he lived with his parents and kept rotting fish in his bedroom.[24] Donkey was modeled after Pericles (born 1994; also known as Perry), a real miniature donkey from Barron Park in Palo Alto, California.[25]Raman Hui, supervising animator of Shrek, stated that Fiona "wasn't based on any real person" and he did many different sketches for her. He had done over 100 sculptures of Fiona before the directors chose the final design.[26] In early development, the art directors visited Hearst Castle, Stratford upon Avon, and Dordogne for inspiration. Art Director Douglas Rogers visited a magnolia plantation in Charleston, South Carolina for inspiration of Shrek's swamp.[27][28] Planned characters not used in the film include Goldilocks and Sleeping Beauty.[29]

During production, animators who failed while working on other projects, such as The Prince of Egypt, were often sent to work on Shrek. The reassignment was known as being "Shreked" and being sent to "the Gulag".[30]

Casting

Nicolas Cage was initially offered the role of Shrek but he turned it down because he did not want to look like an ogre. In 2013, Cage explained furthermore: "When you're drawn, in a way it says more about how children are going to see you than anything else, and I so care about that."[31]

Chris Farley was initially hired to voice Shrek, and he had recorded nearly all of the dialogue for the character, but died before completing the project.[32] A story reel featuring a sample of Farley's recorded dialogue was leaked to the public in August 2015.[33] DreamWorks then re-cast the voice role to Mike Myers, who insisted on a complete script rewrite, to leave no traces of Farley's version of Shrek.[32] According to Myers, he wanted to voice the character "for two reasons: I wanted the opportunity to work with Jeffrey Katzenberg; and [the book is] a great story about accepting yourself for who you are."[17]

After Myers had completed providing the voice for the character, when the film was well into production, he asked to re-record all of his lines with a Scottish accent, similar to that his mother used when she told him bedtime stories and also used for his roles in other films, such as So I Married an Axe Murderer and Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me.[32] According to the DVD commentary, he had also tried using a Lothar of the Hill People accent and a Canadian accent. After hearing the alternative, Katzenberg agreed to redo scenes in the film, saying, "It was so good we took $4M worth of animation out and did it again."[35] A point Myers disputes, saying "it didn't cost the studio 'millions of dollars'," as rumored. "What it meant is instead of me going in for ten sessions, I went in for twenty sessions. I got paid the same."[36] Because of Myers voicing the character, more ideas began to come. There were clearer story points, fresher gags and comedy bits. "I got a letter from Spielberg thanking me so much for caring about the character," Myers said. "And he said the Scottish accent had improved the movie."[38]

Another person planned to voice a character in the film was Janeane Garofalo, who was set to star alongside Farley as Princess Fiona. However, she was fired from the project for unexplained reasons. Years later, Garofalo stated "I was never told why [I was fired]. I assume because I sound like a man sometimes? I don't know why. Nobody told me ... But, you know, the movie didn't do anything, so who cares?"[39]

Animation

Shrek was originally set up to be a live-action/CG animation hybrid with background plate miniature sets and the main characters composited into the scene as motion-captured computer graphics, using an ExpertVision Hires Falcon 10 camera system to capture and apply realistic human movement to the characters.[40] A sizable crew was hired to run a test, and after a year and a half of R & D, the test was finally screened in May 1997. The results were not satisfactory, with Katzenberg stating "It looked terrible, it didn't work, it wasn't funny, and we didn't like it."[32] The studio then turned to its production partners at Pacific Data Images (PDI), who began production with the studio in 1998[42] and helped Shrek get to its final, computer-animated look.[32] At this time, Antz was still in production at the studio[32] and effects supervisor Ken Bielenberg was asked by Aron Warner "to start development for Shrek". Similar to previous PDI films, PDI used its own proprietary software (like the Fluid Animation System) for its animated movies. For some elements, however, it also took advantage of some of the powerhouse animation software on the market. This is particularly true with Maya, which PDI used for most of its dynamic cloth animation and for the hair of Fiona and Farquaad.[44]

"We did a lot of work on character and set-up, and then kept changing the set up while we were doing the animation," Hui noted. "In Antz, we had a facial system that gave us all the facial muscles under the skin. In Shrek, we applied that to whole body. So, if you pay attention to Shrek when he talks, you see that when he opens his jaw, he forms a double chin, because we have the fat and the muscles underneath. That kind of detail took us a long time to get right." One of the most difficult parts of creating the film was making Donkey's fur flow smoothly so that it did not look like that of a Chia Pet. This fell into the hands of the surfacing animators, who used flow controls within a complex shader to provide the fur with many attributes (ability to change directions, lie flat, swirl, etc.).[28] It was then the job of the visual effects group, led by Ken Bielenberg, to make the fur react to environment conditions. Once the technology was mastered, it could be applied to many aspects of the movie, including grass, moss, beards, eyebrows, and even threads on Shrek's tunic. Making human hair realistic was different from Donkey's fur, requiring a separate rendering system and much attention from the lighting and visual effects teams.[28]

Shrek has 31 sequences, with 1,288 total shots.[27] Aron Warner said that the creators "envisioned a magical environment that you could immerse yourself into". Shrek includes 36 separate in-film locations to make the world of the film, which DreamWorks claimed was more than any previous computer-animated feature. In-film locations were finalized and, as demonstrated by past DreamWorks animated movies, color and mood was of the utmost importance.[28]

Music

Main article: Shrek: Music from the Original Motion Picture

Shrek is the third DreamWorks animated film (and the only film in the Shrek series) to have Harry Gregson-Williams team up with John Powell to compose the score following Antz (1998) and Chicken Run (2000).[46] Powell was left out to compose scores for later Shrek films with Gregson-Williams due to a conflict.[47] The score was recorded at Abbey Road Studios by Nick Wollage and Slamm Andrews, with the latter mixing it at Media Ventures and Patricia Sullivan-Fourstar handling mastering.[48]

Shrek introduced a new element to give the film a unique feel. The film used pop music and other Oldies to make the story more forward. Covers of songs like "On the Road Again" and "Try a Little Tenderness" were integrated in the film's score. The band Smash Mouth's song "All Star" gained massive popularity due to its usage in the film's opening credits.[50] As the film was about to be completed, Katzenberg suggested to the filmmakers to redo the film's ending to "go out with a big laugh"; instead of ending the film with just a storybook closing over Shrek and Fiona as they ride off into the sunset, they decided to add a song "I'm a Believer" covered by Smash Mouth and show all the fairytale creatures in the film.

Although Rufus Wainwright's version of the song "Hallelujah" appeared in the soundtrack album, it was John Cale's version that appeared in the film; in a radio interview, Rufus Wainwright suggested that his version of "Hallelujah" did not appear in the film due to the "glass ceiling" he was hitting because of his sexuality. An alternative explanation is that, although the filmmakers wanted Cale's version for the film, licensing issues prevented its use in the soundtrack album, because Wainwright was an artist for DreamWorks but Cale was not.[52]

Cultural references

In many places the film references classic movies, predominantly those by Disney. When Tinker Bell falls on Donkey and he says "I can fly" and people around including the Three Little Pigs say "He can fly, he can fly"; this is a reference to Disney's Peter Pan. This scene is also a reference to the Disney film Dumbo, where Donkey says, while flying, "You might have seen a house fly, maybe even a super fly, but I bet you ain't never seen a Donkey fly!".[53] The scene where Fiona is singing to the blue bird is a reference to Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.[53] The transformation scene at the end of the film references Disney's Beauty and the Beast.[53]

When Shrek crosses the bridge to the Castle and says, "That'll do, Donkey, that'll do", this is a reference to the movie Babe.[53] The scene where Princess Fiona is fighting the Merry Men is a lengthy reference to the film The Matrix.[53] At the end of the film, the Gingerbread Man at the end with a crutch (and one leg) says "God bless us, everyone" which is a reference to Tiny Tim in A Christmas Carol.[53]

In the scene where the Magic Mirror gives Lord Farquaad the option to marry three princesses, it parodies popular American television show The Dating Game featuring: Cinderella and Snow White.[54] In addition, Lord Farquaad's theme park style kingdom Duloc heavily mimics Disneyland, even in so far as parodying the famous "It's a Small World" musical ride in the scene with the singing puppets.[54] It has been suggested that Lord Farquaad himself is an unflattering parody of then-Disney CEO Michael Eisner, whom producer Katzenberg reportedly dislikes.[55]

Release

Marketing

In 2000, IMAX released CyberWorld onto its branded large-screen theaters. It was a compilation film that featured stereoscopic conversions of various animated shorts and sequences, including the bar sequence in Antz. DreamWorks was so impressed by the technology used for the sequence's "stereoscopic translation", that the studio and IMAX decided to plan a big-screen 3D version of Shrek. The film would have been re-released during the Christmas season of 2001, or the following summer, after its conventional 2D release. The re-release would have also included new sequences and an alternate ending. Plans for this was dropped due to "creative changes" instituted by DreamWorks and resulted in a loss of $1.18 million, down from IMAX's profit of $3.24 million.[56][57][58]

Radio Disney was told not to allow any ads for the film to air on the station, stating, "Due to recent initiatives with The Walt Disney Company, we are being asked not to align ourselves promotionally with this new release Shrek. Stations may accept spot dollars only in individual markets."[59] The restriction was later relaxed to allow ads for the film's soundtrack album onto the network.[60]

On May 7, 2001, Burger King began promotions for the film, giving out a selection of nine exclusive Candy Caddies based on the Shrek characters, in Big Kids Meal and Kids Meal orders.[61]Ice cream chain Baskin-Robbins also ran an 8-week promotion of the film, selling products such as Shrek's Hot Sludge Sundae, a combination of Oreo Cookies 'n Cream ice cream, hot fudge, crushed chocolate cookies, whipped cream and squiggly gummy worms, and Shrek Freeze Frame Cake, featuring an image of Shrek and Donkey framed by sunflowers. This was to support the film's DVD/VHS release.[62]

Home media

The film was released by DreamWorks Home Entertainment on VHS and DVD on November 2, 2001.[63][64] Both releases included Shrek in the Swamp Karaoke Dance Party, a 3-minute musical short film, that takes up right after Shrek's ending, with film's characters performing a medley of modern pop songs.[65]

Shrek was released on video the same day that Pixar's Monsters, Inc. hit theaters. Since videos were traditionally released on Tuesdays, Disney's executives did not receive this well, saying that the move "seemed like an underhanded attempt to siphon off some of their film's steam". DreamWorks responded that it "simply shifted the release to a Friday to make it more of an event and predicted that it and other studios would do so more frequently with important films." Monsters, Inc. earned that weekend more than $62 million, breaking the record for an animated film, while Shrek's video release made more than $100 million,[66] and eventually became the biggest selling DVD at the time with over 5.5 million sales.[67]Shrek generated more than $420 million in revenue for DreamWorks on DVD and VHS, and has sold more than 21 million copies of the 23 million shipped by January 2002.[63] Worldwide, more than 10 million Shrek DVDs have been sold by that point.[63]

A 3D version of the film was released on Blu-ray 3D by Paramount Home Entertainment on December 1, 2010, along with its sequels,[68] and a regular 2D Blu-ray boxset of the series was released six days later.[69]

In commemoration of the film's 20th anniversary, an Ultra HD Blu-ray edition was released on May 11, 2021, by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.[70]

Reception and legacy

Box office

Shrek opened on around 6,000 screens[71] across 3,587 theaters;[72] eleven of them showed the film digitally.[73] This was the first time that DreamWorks had shown one of its films digitally.[74] The film earned $11.6 million on its first day and $42.3 million on its opening weekend, topping the box office for the weekend and averaging $11,805 from 3,587 theaters.[75] In its second weekend, due to the Memorial Day Weekend holiday, the film gained 0.3 percent to $42.5 million and $55.2 million over the four-day weekend, resulting in an overall 30 percent gain.[76] Despite this, the film finished in second place behind Pearl Harbor and had an average of $15,240 from expanding to 3,623 sites.[76] In its third weekend, the film retreated 34 percent to $28.2 million for a $7,695 average from expanding to 3,661 theaters.[77] The film closed on December 6, 2001, after grossing $267.7 million domestically, along with $216.7 million overseas, for a worldwide total of $484.4 million.[5] Produced on a $60 million budget, the film was a huge box office smash[5] and is the fourth highest-grossing film of 2001.[78]

Shrek became the highest-grossing animated film ever to be released in Australia, passing the mark set by The Lion King in 1994.[79] In the United Kingdom, Shrek regained the top spot at the British box office after being beaten out the previous week by Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, earning a $20.3 million since its opening in the UK.[80]

Critical response

On review aggregatorRotten Tomatoes, Shrek holds an 88% approval rating based on 208 reviews, with an average rating of 7.80/10. The website's critics consensus reads, "While simultaneously embracing and subverting fairy tales, the irreverent Shrek also manages to tweak Disney's nose, provide a moral message to children, and offer viewers a funny, fast-paced ride."[81]Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, assigned the film a score of 84 out of 100 based on 34 critics, indicating "universal acclaim".[82] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "A" on an A+ to F scale.[83]

Eddie Murphy was particularly praised by reviewers for his performance and role as Donkey.

Roger Ebert praised the film, giving it four stars out of a possible four and describing it as "jolly and wicked, filled with sly in-jokes and yet somehow possessing a heart".[84]USA Today's Susan Wloszczyna praised Eddie Murphy's performance, stating it "gives the comic performance of his career, aided by sensational digital artistry, as he brays for the slightly neurotic motormouth".[85]Richard Schickel of Time also enjoyed Murphy's role, stating "No one has ever made a funnier jackass of himself than Murphy."[86] Peter Rainer of New York magazine liked the script, also stating "The animation, directed by Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson, is often on the same wriggly, giggly level as the script, although the more "human" characters, such as Princess Fiona and Lord Farquaad, are less interesting than the animals and creatures—a common pitfall in animated films of all types."[87]Peter Travers of Rolling Stone wrote "Shrek is a world-class charmer that could even seduce the Academy when it hands out the first official animation Oscar next year."[88] James Berardinelli of ReelViews gave the film three and a half stars out of four, saying "Shrek is not a guilty pleasure for sophisticated movie-goers; it is, purely and simply, a pleasure."[89] Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times wrote "The witty, fractured fairy tale Shrek has a solid base of clever writing."[90] Lisa Schwarzbaum of Entertainment Weekly gave the film an A-, saying "A kind of palace coup, a shout of defiance, and a coming of age for DreamWorks."[91] Jay Boyar of the Orlando Sentinel wrote "It's a pleasure to be able to report that the movie both captures and expands upon the book's playful spirit of deconstruction."[92]

Steven Rosen of The Denver Post wrote "DreamWorks Pictures again proves a name to trust for imaginative, funny animated movies that delight kids and adults equally."[93] Susan Stark of The Detroit News gave the film four out of four stars, saying "Swift, sweet, irreverent, rangy and as spirited in the writing and voice work as it is splendid in design."[94] Jami Bernard of the New York Daily News gave the film four out of four stars, saying "The brilliance of the voice work, script, direction and animation all serve to make Shrek an adorable, infectious work of true sophistication."[95] Rene Rodriguez gave the film three out of four stars, calling it "a gleefully fractured fairy tale that never becomes cynical or crass".[96] Elvis Mitchell of The New York Times gave the film four out of five stars, saying "Beating up on the irritatingly dainty Disney trademarks is nothing new; it's just that it has rarely been done with the demolition-derby zest of Shrek."[97]William Steig, the author of the original book, and his wife Jeanne Steig also enjoyed the film, stating "We all went sort of expecting to hate it, thinking, 'What has Hollywood done to it?' But we loved it. We were afraid it would be too sickeningly cute and, instead, Bill just thought they did a wonderful, witty job of it."[98]

John Anderson of Newsday wrote "The kind of movie that will entertain everyone of every age and probably for ages to come."[99] Jay Carr of The Boston Globe wrote "In an era when much on film seems old, Shrek seems new and fresh and clever."[100] Stephen Hunter of The Washington Post gave the film five out of five stars, saying "Despite all its high-tech weirdness, it is really that most perdurable of human constructions, a tale told well and true."[101] Joe Baltake of The Sacramento Bee wrote that it "isn't so much a fractured spoof of everything Disney, but actually a Monty Python flick for kids – kids of all ages".[100] Andrew Sarris of The New York Observer wrote "What gives Shrek its special artistic distinction is its witty and knowingly sassy dialogue, delivered by vocally charismatic performers whose voices remind us of their stellar screen personae in live-action movies."[102] Lisa Alspector of the Chicago Reader wrote "This romantic fantasy complicates the roles of beauty and beast, making it hard to guess what form a sensitive resolution will take."[103] Joe Morgenstern of The Wall Street Journal wrote "The charms of Shrek, which is based on the children's book by William Steig, go far beyond in-jokes for adults."[104] John Zebrowski of The Seattle Times gave the film three out of four stars, saying "The movie is helped immensely by its cast, who carry it through some of the early, sluggish scenes. But this is Murphy's movie. Donkey gets most of the good lines, and Murphy hits every one."[105]

A mixed review came from Mark Caro of the Chicago Tribune, who gave the film two and a half stars out of four and compared it to Toy Story 2, which he said "had a higher in-jokes/laughs ratio without straining to demonstrate its hipness or to evoke heartfelt emotions".[106] On the more negative side, Michael Atkinson of The Village Voice said he was "desperately avoiding the risk of even a half-second of boredom", and said "the movie is wall-to-window-to-door noise, babbling, and jokes (the first minute sees the first fart gag), and demographically it's a hard-sell shotgun spray."[107] Christy Lemire of the Associated Press described Shrek as a "90-minute onslaught of in-jokes", and said while it "strives to have a heart" with "a message about beauty coming from within", "somehow [the message] rings hollow".[100] Anthony Lane of The New Yorker said, despite the film "cunning the rendering of surfaces, there's still something flat and charmless in the digital look, and most of the pleasure rises not from the main romance but from the quick, incidental gags."[108]

Accolades

At the 74th Academy Awards, Shrek won the first ever Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, beating Monsters, Inc. and Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius. It was also the first animated film to be nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay.[109][110][111][112]Entertainment Weekly put it on its end-of-the-decade, "best-of" list, saying, "Prince Charming? So last millennium. This decade, fairy-tale fans – and Princess Fiona – fell for a fat and flatulent Ogre. Now, that's progress."[113] It was also nominated for The Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy.[114][115]

Shrek was also nominated for 6 BAFTA Awards, including the BAFTA Award for Best Film. Eddie Murphy became the first actor to ever receive a BAFTA nomination for a voice-over performance. The film was also nominated for Best Visual Effects, Best Sound, Best Film Music, and won the BAFTA Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.[116]Shrek was nominated for a dozen Annie Awards from ASIFA-Hollywood, and won eight Annies including Best Animated Feature and Outstanding Individual Achievement for Directing in an Animated Feature Production.[117]

In June 2008, the American Film Institute revealed its "Ten top Ten"; the best ten films in ten "classic" American film genres—after polling over 1,500 people from the creative community Shrek was acknowledged as the eighth best film in the animated genre, and the only non-Disney·Pixar film in the Top 10.[118][119]Shrek was also ranked second in a Channel 4 poll of the "100 Greatest Family Films", losing out on the top spot to E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.[120] In 2005, Shrek came sixth in Channel 4's 100 Greatest Cartoons poll behind The Simpsons, Tom and Jerry, South Park, Toy Story and Family Guy.[121] In November 2009, the character, Lord Farquaad, was listed No. 14 in IGN UK's "Top 15 Fantasy Villains".[122] In 2006, it was ranked third on Bravo's 100 funniest films list.[123] The film's title character was awarded his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in May 2010.[124]

American Film Institute recognition:

Festivals

Shrek premiered at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival, where it competed for the Palme d'Or,[7] making it the first animated film since Disney's Peter Pan (1953) to be chosen to do so.[8]

Cultural impact

Previous films and TV shows, such as Fractured Fairy Tales and The Princess Bride, have parodied the traditional fairy tale.[125] However, Shrek itself has noticeably influenced the current generation of mainstream animated films.[125] Particularly after Shrek 2, animated films began to incorporate more pop culture references and end-film musical numbers.[125] Such elements can be seen in films like Robots, Chicken Little and Doogal.[125] It also inspired a number of computer animated films which also spoofed fairy tales, or other related story genres, often including adult-oriented humor, most of which were not nearly as successful as Shrek, such as Happily N'Ever After, Igor, and Hoodwinked![125] In 2020, the film was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".[126][127]

Other media

See also: Shrek The Musical

Several video game adaptations of the film have been published on various game console platforms, including Shrek (2001), Shrek: Hassle at the Castle (2002), Shrek: Extra Large (2002), Shrek: Super Party (2002) and Shrek SuperSlam (2005).[128] Shrek was also included as a bonus unlockable character in the video game Tony Hawk's Underground 2 (2004).[129]

In 2003, Dark Horse Comics released a three-issue mini-series comic book adaptation of Shrek which was written by Mark Evanier, and the issues were later compiled into a trade paperback.[130]

A musical version, based on the film, with music by Jeanine Tesori and a book and lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaire, opened on Broadway on December 14, 2008, and closed January 3, 2010, running for a total of 441 performances.[131] It starred Brian d'Arcy James in the title role, Sutton Foster as Princess Fiona, Christopher Sieber as Lord Farquaad, Daniel Breaker as Donkey, and John Tartaglia as Pinocchio.[131] The Broadway production was recorded and released on DVD, Blu-ray and digital media.[132][133][134] A North American Tour opened July 25, 2010, in Chicago.[131] A London production opened in the West End on June 7, 2011.[135] The musical received many Tony Award nominations and won the 2009 Tony Award for Best Costume Design. It received five Laurence Olivier Award nominations including Best New Musical.[136]

A shot-for-shot fan remake titled Shrek Retold was released through 3GI Industries on November 29, 2018. The project was a collaboration of 200 filmmakers and mixes live action, hand drawn animation, Flash animation, CGI and various other art forms to recreate the film. The film is available on YouTube for free.[137][138]

Sequels and spin-offs

Main article: Shrek (franchise)

Three sequels were released over the years – the Oscar-nominated Shrek 2 in 2004, Shrek the Third in 2007, and Shrek Forever After in 2010. Shrek 2 was the only one to receive similar acclaim from critics,[139][140][141] though all three sequels were commercially successful.[142][143]Shrek the Halls (2007) and Scared Shrekless (2010) were released as holiday-themed short films, and a spin-off prequel film entitled Puss in Boots was released in 2011.[144] A fifth feature film was originally planned during the development of Shrek Forever After, but the idea was later abandoned by DreamWorks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg.[145][144] Leading up to NBCUniversal's planned acquisition of DreamWorks Animation in 2016, it was announced that a fifth Shrek film would be released in 2019.[146] On November 6, 2018, Variety reported that Chris Meledandri had been tasked to reboot both Shrek and Puss in Boots, with the original cast potentially returning to reprise their roles.[147][148] While cast members reported that a script was completed for a fifth Shrek film, development stalled and future plans have yet to be officially announced.[149][150]

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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrek
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A List of Spoofs and References in PDI/DreamWorks Animated Shrek

Note: This is a continously updated list (last updated June 16, 2001). If you have an insight to add, please click here or email your additions to [email protected]

The following is a list of spoofs found in PDI/DreamWorks animated movie, Shrek:

- When Tinkerbell falls on Donkey and he says "I can fly" and people around including three little pigs, go say "He can fly, he can fly" it is referencing Disney's Peter Pan movie.

- When Donkey is flying he says "You might have seen a house fly, a super fly, but I bet you've never seen a Donkey fly." This is a reference to Disney's Dumbo.

- When Shrek crosses the bridge to the Castle and says, "That'll do, Donkey, that´ll do" he is referencing the movie Babe.

- Fiona singing to blue bird is a reference to SnowWhite and the Seven Dwarfs.

- Princess Fiona fighting the Merry Men is a lengthy reference to The Matrix.

- Transformation scene at the end strongly references Beauty and the Beast.

- Gingerbread Man at the end with a crutch (and one leg) saying, "God bless you everone" is a reference to little Timmy in A Christmas Carol.

Add your reference here or email it to [email protected] The references to date have been provided by Joe Tracy, Lisa Hayes, and Lord Cardo (forum name).


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Shrek - M.J. Thriller HD

The Shrek Franchise's 16 Best Pop Culture References

Shrek broke the mold by reversing a centuries-old trope: it gave agency to ogres, who have always been slandered in fairy tales, providing a happy ending for everyone (except the villains, of course). In the process, the Shrek franchise alluded to a vast number of films, TV shows, celebrities, and even commercials.

RELATED: 10 Continuity Errors In The Shrek Franchise

Almost nothing was spared by the writers of the film franchise: Ex-Lax, The Beatles, McDonald's, NYC, Hollywood, Spider-Man, Indiana Jones, Justin Timberlake, even parodying various aspects of Disney movies.

Updated on August 26th, 2021 by Jessica Jalali: A major thing that made the original Shrek movie so ahead of its time was the use of pop culture references. It encouraged a trend in animated movies that can still be seen in the references and innuendos of animated films of the present.  Using more adult jokes and references has helped elevate the animation genre to not be seen as something kid-exclusive, but instead as a more inclusive genre that is enjoyable for people of all ages. The best pop culture references in the Shrek franchise all deserve a shoutout.

16 When Duloc Copies It's A Small World

When Shrek and Donkey arrive in Duloc in the first Shrek movie, they come to a welcome stand that unravels to show figurines singing an annoyingly catchy song in the style of Disney's iconic "It's a Small World" ride.

The sickly sweet musical display is a hilarious contrast to Shrek and Donkey's sarcastic disposition and Shrek's overall cynical outlook. The bewildered look on Shrek and Donkey's faces at the end of the musical welcoming shows their disillusioned outlooks with Donkey's enthusiastic exclamations at the end showing that, while Donkey is as disenchanted as Shrek at times, he's actually quite the softie.

15 When The Magic Mirror Mimics The Dating Game

When Lord Farquad is presented with his choices for a potential wife, the Magic Mirror presents the choices in the same fashion as the iconic game show The Dating Game.

The groovy background music of the show, distinctive backdrop, and the usage of The Dating Game's famous catchphrase, "Bachelorette #1, Bachelorette #2, or Bachelorette #3", makes it a clear call back to the game show and a simple gag that both kids and adults can enjoy.

14 When Shrek Takes Part In A WWE-Style Wrestling Match

To determine who will be the knight sent on the quest to rescue Princess Fiona, a tournament is used as the test to see who is the bravest, until Shrek and Donkey show up. Then the rules of the game are changed so that whoever can kill Shrek will be the chosen knight.

RELATED: Shrek's Enemies, Ranked By Power

What ensues is an all-out WWE wrestling-type brawl. Shrek pile drives, ankle locks, and tombstones someone based on the move by the iconic WWE wrestler The Undertaker. Shrek even uses a chair as a weapon, a well-known wrestling trope seen in the WWE and beyond.

13 When Shrek Referenced Babe

Shrek borrows from the ridiculously cute and whimsical pig movie Babe (1995) when he references the film in the line "That'll do, Donkey. That'll do." The famous line "That'll do, pig. That'll do." comes from the kids classic.

Though it's a movie reference, Shrek actually means it when he says it. He'd just coerced Donkey into conquering his fear of crossing the bridge over the lava around Fiona's castle, and the statement has some genuine affection behind it, even if it's a little sarcastic.

12 When Fiona Shows Off Her Bullet Time Martial Arts Skills

In many ways, Fiona is like a real classic Disney princess in the original Shrek, waiting all alone in her tower for her prince to come and rescue her. The fact of the matter, however, is that Fiona can handle herself rather well.

When Monsieur Hood–a blatant satire of Robin Hood–drags Fiona away, she knocks him out with a single kick before proceeding to take out all his Merrymen with effortless grace. At one point in the fight, she pauses in mid-air, arms splayed out in a perfect mirroring of Trinity's fight during the opening sequence of The Matrix (1999).

11 When Fiona Sang Like Snow White

Disney's first animated full-length feature film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), is referenced in the original Shrek movie when Fiona is in the forest and sings to the animals and goes tit-for-tat with a bluebird.

The playful competition between Fiona and the bluebird goes too far though when the bird attempts to copy Fiona's very high-pitched, long note, making itself explode. Shrek pokes fun at the Disney version of the Brothers Grimm princess by calling back to Snow White's playful musical relationship with the animals and having Princess Fiona's musical moment become morbidly humourous, cementing the sometimes dark wit of the movie.

10 When The Gingerbread Man Looks and Sounds Like Tiny Tim

Complete with a crutch–albeit a candy cane one–Gingy is a playful homage to the innocent Tiny Tim of Charles Dickens's holiday classic A Christmas Carol. This is shown most strongly at the end of the film when the Gingerbread Man says "God bless us, everyone."

RELATED: 5 Characters From Shrek We'd Totally Hang Out With (& 5 Who Need To Get Out Of Our Swamp)

The line is one of the most famous associated with the iconic story and appears in just about every adaptation of A Christmas Carol. In Shrek, it hammers in just how lovable the fan-favorite character is.

9 When Pinocchio Parodies Mission: Impossible

When Shrek, Donkey, and Puss in Boots are trapped, it's up to Pinocchio and Gingy to save them. Being a puppet, Pinocchio has the ability to let himself down to where the trapped characters are with his strings.

This scene is a recreation of an iconic scene starring Ethan Hunt in Mission: Impossible (1996), in which he does the Cable Drop using a set of wires, thereby avoiding the pressure-sensitive detectors on the floor.

8 When Shrek and Shrek 2 Both Referenced Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

The sequel to the quintessential adventure movie, Raiders of the Lost Ark(1981)Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) may not be as adored as its predecessor but it still got a lot of things right. Temple of Doom has proven to be just as influential as the first film in the franchise. It's alluded to in the firstShrek movie when the rope bridge around Fiona's castle breaks during the escape.

The movie was referenced again in the sequel when Puss in Boots snatches his hat from underneath a closing door, mimicking the iconic move made by Indy in Temple of Doom.

7 When Puss In Boots Became A Chestburster

Puss in Boots, himself a tribute to Zorro and the fairy tale of the same name, is hired by King Harold to take care of the ogre problem "troubling" his daughter. At first sight, Shrek thinks he's an adorable little kitty, beckoning him over. However, he soon realizes his mistake when Puss attacks him, claws extended, causing Shrek to scream and flail about.

RELATED: 10 Best Movie & TV Show References To Ridley Scott's Alien

Puss then enters Shrek's clothing, scrambling all over his body before bursting out of his tunic in a spectacular reference to the chestburster scene in Alien (1979) where a Xenomorph larva horrifically emerges from Kane's rib cage, killing him in the process.

6 When Queen Lillian Accidentally Quotes Seinfeld

During Shrek and Fiona's first dinner with her parents, tensions are running high, with King Harold making snide remarks about Shrek's heritage ("his type," as he refers to it). He asks Shrek what kind of grandchildren he could expect from the latter's union with Fiona, to which Shrek angrily responds, "Ogres! Yes!"

Queen Lillian decides to defuse the situation by adding "Not that there's anything wrong with that", which is a line used in Seinfeld by Jerry and George as a way to avoid being seen as homophobic, while still making it clear that they themselves aren't gay. This line in both contexts is still ultimately problematic, though.

5 When Fiona Becomes Marilyn Monroe

The Fairy Godmother introduces herself to Fiona by barging into her room and charming her furniture to fly around while singing. In her bid to convince Fiona that she deserves a human prince, she forces her into a shiny gold dress, which she then causes to fly up above Fiona's knees.

This is a reference to The Seven Year Itch (1955), where Marilyn Monroe's dress flies up while standing over a subway grate, one of the most iconic Hollywood images ever.

4 When Puss In Boots Does A Move From Flashdance

Puss in Boots is a classic diva, given his penchant for theatrics. While singing a rendition of Ricky Martin's "Livin' La Vida Loca", he leans back in a chair and tugs on a chain, causing a shower of water to fall on him. Alex Owens executes the same move in Flashdance (1983) as part of her performance in the local cabaret.

This shot is so iconic that it has been parodied several times, for instance, in Deadpool 2 (2018), Deadpool has a shower of bullet casings being poured over him.

3 When Pinocchio Channels Michael Jackson

Pinocchio may not actually be a real boy (to his constant chagrin), but he most certainly is a phenomenal dancer. During the "Livin' La Vida Loca" number, Pinocchio shows everyone how to move like The King of Pop himself, Michael Jackson.

He does the moonwalk, the crotch grab, and, if the volume is loud enough, one can hear a plaintive "Oooh" coming from his mouth, although it is mostly drowned out by the band.

2 When Fiona's Wedding Ring Alluded To The One Ring

In Shrek 2, a gnome is shown removing a red-hot ring from the fire, carefully handing it to Shrek, so he can give it to Fiona. However, Shrek loses his grip over it, sending it flying into the air and consequently landing on Fiona's finger as the audience is shown it from a topdown perspective.

This is an exact copy of the scene in The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) where Frodo stumbles over a stranger's foot, with the One Ring landing on his finger. In fact, the parody continues further when Fiona's ring glows with a warm "I Love You," a sweet allusion to the Black Speech of Mordor engraved on the Ring.

1 When Shrek And Fiona Perform A Cinematic Hat-trick

In one short scene, Shrek spoofs three movies. During the honeymoon sequence, Shrek and Fiona are seen kissing on the beach as a wave washes over them, a reference to From Here To Eternity (1955). When the wave ebbs, Fiona is gone and Shrek is making out with a mermaid who is a dead ringer for Ariel from The Little Mermaid (1989).

In a rage, Fiona flings the mermaid back into the sea, where she is instantly eaten by two sharks, one of which bears a striking resemblance to the shark from the famous poster for Jaws (1975).

NEXT: Everything We Know About Shrek 5 So Far

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& the Bowser from Outer Space! 148,573 Pages. Register Start a Wiki. Explore Wikis; Community Central; Start a Wiki; Search Sign In Don't have an account? Wiki Content. ChicagoRailFan2477, Shrek movie-spoofs. Scratchpad II Wiki. BingBongFansStyle's Movie Spoof of Shrek Cast Diego (Ice Age) as Shrek King Julien (Madagascar) as Donkey Gomo Tomogo (Big Hero 6) as Princess Fiona (Human) Shira (Ice Age: Continental Drift) as Princess Fiona (Ogre) Lord Presedint Buisness (The Lego Movie) as Lord Farquaad Master Tigress (Kung Fu Panda) As Dragon Classified (Penguins of Madagascar (2015)) as Big Bad Wolf Surly … Alex (Shrek) Add a photo to this gallery. Edit. Category:Rated PG Movie Spoofs | Scratchpad II Wiki | Fandom. … Category:Shrek Movies | The Parody Wiki | Fandom. -Welcome to CREA TVs! A short 4-D film, Shrek 4-D, which originally was a theme park ride, was released in 2003. The Loop (TV) Do you like this video? Disney and BBC's movie-spoof of 2001 DreamWorks film "Shrek". Brock (Shrek) Add a photo to this gallery. Movie-Spoofs. Register Start a Wiki. Scenes from Shrek Movie Spoofs. 1 DreamWorks Madagascar in May 27, 2005; 2 Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa in November 7, 2008; 3 Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted in June 8, 2012; 4 Madagascar in Background Colors; DreamWorks Madagascar in May 27, 2005 [edit | edit source] Madagascar VHS November 15, 2005; Madagascar Special … Scratchpad II Wiki. Add new page. A movie-spoof of Shrek. 5,349 Pages. 1,490 Pages. Friends: Donkey, Fiona, Puss in Boots Enemies: Lord Farquaad Likes: his swamp, his wife Fiona Dislikes: Donkey annoying sounds, people coming into his swamp Shrek - Fred Jones (Scooby-Doo) Donkey - Fievel (An American Tail) Princess Fiona (Human) - Ariel (The Little Mermaid) Princess Fiona (Ogre) - Daphne Blake (Scooby-Doo) Lord Farquaad - Ben Ravencroft (Scooby-Doo and the Witch's Ghost) Dragon - Stormfly (How to Train Your Dragon) Puss in Boots - Piglet (Winnie the Pooh) The Big Bad Wolf - Goofy (Mickey Mouse) The Three Little Pigs - Ed, … Shrek is a 2001 American computer-animated comedy film loosely based on the 1990 fairy tale picture book of the same name by William Steig.Directed by Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson in their directorial debuts, it stars Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz and John Lithgow as the voices of the lead characters. Best Spoof Movies All Time Ranked by hitherto92 | created - 26 Dec 2013 | updated - 8 months ago | Public Refine See titles to watch instantly, titles you haven't rated, etc. YogiBearRockz2019's movie-spoof of Shrek. Disney and BBC's movie-spoof of 2001 DreamWorks film "Shrek". George's … Fandom Apps Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. Abeiscool40's gender swapped version of Shrek (2001) Contents. Shrek - Tyrone (The Backyardigans) Donkey - Clifford (Clifford the Big Red Dog) Princess Fiona (Human) - Miranda (Blue's Clues) Princess Fiona (Ogre) - Uniqua (The Backyardigans) Lord Farquaad - Evil Joe Dragon - Burdette (It's a Big Big World) Gingy - Roary (Roary the Racing Car) Pinocchio - Wubbzy (Wow Wow Wubbzy) … Recently Changed Pages. Category page. Davidchannel's movie-spoofs of Dreamworks Animation SKG's 2001 computer-animated comedy film Shrek. Sesame Street (GroverKnoverRockz Style) VeggieTales: Manuel Sing-Along Songs and More! BarneyRockz's Movie Spoof of 2001 DreamWorks Film "Shrek" Cast. Games Movies TV Video. Gender Swap; Genderswap Spoofs; Female Style; Ellie (Shrek) Edit. Explore Wikis; Community Central; Start a Wiki; Search This wiki This wiki All wikis | Sign In Don't have an account? Edit. Percy (Shrek) Edit. History Talk (0) Comments Share. Wikis. watch 01:41. Puss in Boots - General Shanker (Escape from Planet Earth) Fiona (Ogre) -Evelyn Deavor (Incredibles 2) Lord Farquaad -Harold Wilfred (SML) Prince Charming -BasilThe Baker Street (The Great Mouse Dective) Fairy Godmother -Gali(Bionicle: Mask of Light) Rapunzel - Ms. Brisby(The Secret Of … : A Dinosaur's Story) The Big Bad Wolf - Diego (Ice Age) Three Little Pigs - Tigger, Pooh, and Rabbit … Games Movies TV Video. Add new page. IceAgeForever's Movie's Spoof of "Shrek" Shrek - Tramp (Lady and the Tramp; 1955) Donkey - Mushu (Mulan; 1998) Princess Fiona (Human) - Merida (Brave) Princess Fiona (Ogre) - Lady (Lady and the Tramp; 1955) Lord Farquaad - Governor Ratcliffe (Pocahontas; 1995) Dragon - Elsa (We're Back! FANDOM. Shrek is a media franchise by DreamWorks Animation, loosely based on William Steig's 1990 picture book of the same name.It includes four computer-animated films: Shrek (2001), Shrek 2 (2004), Shrek the Third (2007), and Shrek Forever After (2010), with a fifth film currently in the works. Explore Wikis; Community Central; Start a Wiki; Search This wiki This wiki All wikis | Sign In Don't have an account? Princess Fiona (Shrek) as Dory Vanellope von Schweetz (Wreck-It Ralph) as Baby Dory Félicie Milliner (Leap!) D&D Beyond Wiki Content. Category:Shrek movie-spoofs | Scratchpad II Wiki | Fandom. It's loosely based on the 1990 fairy tale picture book with the same name by William Steig. Edit. Edit source History Talk (0) Contents. Shrek - Corn (Corn & Peg) Donkey - Cooper (Trolls) Princess Fiona (Human) - Sam Manson (Danny Phantom) Princess Fiona (Ogre) - Peg (Corn & Peg) Lord Farquaad - Victor Quartermaine (Wallace and Gromit in the Curse of the Were-Rabbit) Dragon - DJ Suki (Trolls) Big Bad Wolf - Discord (MLP: … Shrek The Third Movie Spoofs; Shrek Forever After Movie Spoofs; Shrek Parodies; Shrek 2 Parodies; Shrek The Third Parodies; Shrek Forever After Parodies; Shrek Spoofs; Shrek 2 Spoofs; Shrek The Third Spoofs; Shrek Forever After Spoofs; Grinch (Shrek) Edit. The Muppet Movie (RobintheFrogRockz2021 Style) SesameTales: Sani-Boy! 5,349 Pages. Spike (Shrek) Add a photo to this gallery. Cast: Edit. Add new page . Games Movies TV Video. Now Playing Spoof; Shrek movie-spoofs; Shrek parodies; Bob (Shrek) Edit. Abeiscool40, Shrek Movies, Shrek Movie Spoofs, and 3 more. Recently Changed Pages . Games Movies TV Video. The Parody Wiki. We post a clip at 8:00 am (New York time) on Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday. Cast: Shrek - Thomas O'Malley (The Aristocats) Donkey - Orinoco (The Wombles) Princess Fiona (Human) - Gadget Hackwrench (Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers) Princess Fiona (Ogre) - Duchess (The Aristocats) Lord Farquaad - Scamboli (Pinocchio 3000) The Dragon - Mothra (Godzilla) The Big Bad Wolf - Bonkers … Register Start a Wiki. Edit source History Talk (0) Comments Share. Cast for Shrek 1 [edit | edit source] Shrek - Mario (Super Mario Anime 1986) Donkey - Twilight Sparkle (My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic) Princess Fiona (Human) - May (Pokémon) Princess Fiona (Ogre) - Princess Peach (Super Mario Anime 1986) Lord Farquaad - Judge Claude Frollo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) Dragon - … Shrek is a ogre from Shrek film series. Walt Disney Pictures movie spoof "Shrek" coming soon this Christmas. Recently Changed Pages. Category page. watch 01:41. History Talk (0) Comments Share. Disney and Sega's movie-spoof of 2001's DreamWorks film, "Shrek" Shrek - Orinoco (The Wombles) Donkey - Berk (The Trap Door) Princess Fiona (Human) - Angelica (Titanic: The Legend Goes On) Princess Fiona (Ogre) - Nellie the Elephant Lord Farquaad - Danny (Tourettes Guy) Dragon - Duchess (The Aristocats) The Big Bad Wolf - The Ringmaster (Dumbo) The Three Little Pigs - Flynn Rider … The Loop (TV) Do you like this video? Uranimated18 Wiki. Shrek - Yogi Bear (Yogi Bear; 2010) Donkey - Donkey (horse form) (Shrek 2) Lord Farquaad - Jafar (Aladdin; 2019) Fiona (human form) - Jasmine (Aladdin; 2019) Female Dragon - Cassie (Dragon Tales) Monsieur Robin Hood - Winnie the Pooh (Christopher Robin; 2018) Merry Men - Piglet, Tigger, Rabbit, Eeyore, and Roo (Christopher Robin; 2018) Friar … Madagascar movie-spoof. Cast Bob as Shrek Manny Garcia as Donkey Princess Poppy as Princess Fiona Human Wendy as Princess Fiona Ogre Clayton as Lord Farquaad Kelly as Dragon … History Talk (0) Share. Davidchannel, Shrek Movie Spoofs, Shrek 2 Movie Spoofs, and 10 more. Add new page. Explore Wikis; Community Central; Start a Wiki; Search This wiki This wiki All wikis | Sign In Don't have an account? Register Start a Wiki. Wiki Content. Wikis. Cast (Made By ChicagoRailFan2477) Shrek - Percy (Thomas and Friends) Donkey - Spike (My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic) Princess Fiona (Human) - Nala (The Lion King) Princess Fiona (Ogre) - Rosie (Thomas and Friends) Lord Farquaad - Shere Khan (The Jungle Book) Thenlonious - Kaa (The … 1 Cast; 2 Scenes; 3 Transcripts; 4 Gallery; Cast. Cast. Cast: Shrek - Hampton (Winston Steinburger and Sir Dudley Ding Dong), Donkey - Melvin (Harvey Street Kids), Human Fiona - Sunny (Sunny Day), Ogre Fiona - Rosie Redd (Rainbow Rangers) History Talk (0) Comments Share. TheCartoonMan6107; Space Jam (TheCartoonMan6107 Style) Looney … Category:Shrek 2 Movie Spoofs | Uranimated18 Wiki | Fandom. Wikis. as Tween Dory ??? Diddy (Shrek) is NintendoRockz's Movie-Spoof of "Shrek (2001)". Edit source History Talk (0) Opening to Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas 2018 DVD (Disney Movie Club) Trending pages . TheCartoonMan6107's movie spoof of "Shrek" It will appeared on Youtube on March 27, 2025. Villainfan1991 Movie Spoof Shrek Shrek -AUTO(WALL-E) Donkey - VladVladikoff (Horton Hears a Who!) Gallery:Add a photo to this gallery Thomas O'Malley's movie-spoof of "Shrek". Wikis. Shrek - Tigger (Christopher Robin; 2018) Donkey - Winnie the Pooh (Winnie the Pooh) Pinocchio - Pinocchio (Pinocchio; 1940) Geppetto - Geppetto (Pinocchio; 1940) Donkey's Owner - Christopher Robin (Winnie the Pooh; 2011) Captain of the Guards - Scallion #1 (VeggieTales) Lord Farquaad - Captain Hook (Peter Pan; 1953) Gingy - Jiminy Cricket (Pinocchio; … Shrek Movie Spoofs, Disney and BBC, Now Playing Movies, and 3 more. Popular pages. 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