Fundations long vowel sounds

Fundations long vowel sounds DEFAULT

Teaching Long Vowels to Children

Understanding Long Vowels and the Silent "E"

Long vowels are those in which the sounds of the letters A, E, I, O, and U match the spoken name of the letter. They are usually taught from preschool through the first grade.

Oftentimes, a word with a short vowel is transformed into a long vowel by placing a silent letter "e" at the end of the word.

For example:

  • By adding "e," "mat" becomes "mate."
  • By adding "e," "win" becomes "wine."
  • By adding "e," "hop" becomes "hope."
  • By adding "e," "tub" becomes "tube."

One exception is the letter "e," wherein the addition of a silent "e" rule does not apply.

There are many similar exceptions that can cause child confusion when first starting. It requires the teacher to stage the instruction to outline each rule and exception individually. By working closely with the teacher, you, as the parent, can begin helping out at home.

Sours: https://www.verywellfamily.com/teaching-long-vowels-phonics-skills

In kindergarten, we learn the names of, sounds of, and formation of letters A-Z.

We begin to decode short words by identifying the sounds at the beginning, middle, and ending of words and recognize that words have short and long vowel sounds in them.

We focus on reading words with blends and digraphs in them (bl, sk, wh, th, etc.) and how to blend letters together to read words.

We use our phonics curriculum, Fundations, to make learning to read FUN!

Writing Paper.pdf

Letter-Sound Cards Practice

Ms. Kong Fundations Virtual Classroom

Ms. Kong's Fundations Virtual Classroom

Fundations Parent Support.pdf

Fundations Parent Support Packet

Fundations Level 1 Orientation Slide Show.pptx
Large Sound Cards.PDF

Letter-Keyword-Sound Cards

Unit 1, Week 1 - Letters Tt, Bb, Ff

Unit 1, Week 2 - Letters Mm and Nn

Unit 1, Week 3 - Letters Cc and Aa

Unit 1, Week 4 - Letters Ii and Rr

Unit 1, Week 5 - Letters Ii and Rr

Unit 1, Week 6 - Letters Dd and Ss

Unit 1, Week 7 - Letters Ee and Uu

Unit 1, Week 8 - Letters Ll, Hh and Kk

Unit 1, Week 9 - Letters Pp and Jj

Unit 1, Week 10 - Letters Vv and Ww

Unit 1, Week 11 - Letters Zz and Qu

Unit 1, Week 12 - Letters Yy and Xx

Sours: https://sites.google.com/a/nhcs.net/ms-kong/fundations--phonics
  1. Guitar lyrics
  2. Etc visualizer
  3. Kraft paper drawer boxes

Fundations

Wilson Fundations for K-3 is a phonological/phonemic awareness, phonics and spelling program for the general education classroom. Fundations is based upon the Wilson Reading System® principles and serves as a prevention program to help reduce reading and spelling failure. 
     Each day there is a lesson that uses a variety of strategies to teach the students spelling patterns and rules. Some of these activities are dictation of sounds, words, trick words, and sentences; drill sounds; echo/find letters, words; letter formation; and a variety of other activities. During a lesson the students use sound cards, magnetic tile boards, dry erase boards, gel boards, sky writing, and workbooks to practice and master these skills. 
     There will be a Unit Check Up and a Unit Test. However, this is not a traditional spelling test-the words are not given in advance. Students are expected to use the strategies they have been taught to spell the words. These are strategies that should carry over into the students reading and writing.



Syllable Types
These syllables can be combined to make multisyllabic words.
There are 6 syllable types:
Closed SyllableVowel-Consant-e SyllableOpen Syllable
1. This syllable can only have one vowel.
2. The vowel is followed by one or more consonants.
3. The vowel sound is short.
Examples: cup, whip, last, strap, brunch
1. This syllable has a vowel, then aconsonant, then an e.
2. The first vowel is long
3. The is silent.
Examples: cape, home, pine, plane, kite, shame, tube
1. This syllable has only one vowelwhich is the last letter in the syllable.
2. The vowel sound is long.
Example: he, she, hi, no, so, by, flu, shy, sku, pro, me, my
r-controlled SyllableVowel Digraph/Dipthong Syllable (Double Vowel)Consonant-le Syllable

1. This syllable contains a single vowel followed by an r (ar, er, ir, or, ur).
2. The vowel is neither long nor short; it is controlled by the r.
Examples: ar-car; er-her; ir-bird; or-horn; ur-burn

1. This syllable contains 2 vowels that work together as a team.
2. These vowels together make one sound.
1. This syllable has only three letters: aconsonant, an l, and an e.
2. The e is silent. It is the vowel. Every syllable needs at least one vowel. The consonant and the l are sounded like a blend.
3. This syllable is always last in amultisyllabic word.
Examples: gobble, bugle


Syllable Types
These syllables can be combined to make multisyllabic words.
There are 6 syllable types:
Closed Syllable Vowel-Consonant-e Syllable Open Syllable
1. This syllable can only have one vowel.
2. The vowel is followed by one or more consonants.
3. The vowel sound is short.
Examples: cup, whip, last, strap, brunch
1. This syllable has a vowel, then a consonant, then an e.
2. The first vowel is long
3. The is silent.
Examples: cape, home, pine, plane, kite, shame, tube
1. This syllable has only one vowel which is the last letter in the syllable.
2. The vowel sound is long.
Example: he, she, hi, no, so, by, flu, shy, sku, pro, me, my r-controlled Syllable Vowel Digraph/Dipthong Syllable (Double Vowel)Consonant-le Syllable
1. This syllable contains a single vowel followed by an r (ar, er, ir, or, ur).
2. The vowel is neither long nor short; it is controlled by the r.
Examples: ar-car; er-her; ir-bird; or-horn; ur-burn
1. This syllable contains 2 vowels that work together as a team.
2. These vowels together make one sound.
1. This syllable has only three letters: a consonant, an l, and an e.
2. The e is silent. It is the vowel. Every syllable needs at least one vowel. The consonant and the l are sounded like a blend.
3. This syllable is always last in a multisyllabic word.
Information Packet for Parents
Vocabulary, Rules, & Unit Overviews
Chicken Letter – q is called the “chicken letter” because it goes no where without u
Digraph – contains two consonants and only makes one sound: wh, sh, ch, th, ck
Blend – contains two or three consonants, but each keeps its own sound: sm, tr, spl
Digraph Blend – a digraph blended with another consonant, such as n and ch in the word bunch.
Spelling of the /k/ sound: At the end of one-syllable words, ck is used
immediately after short vowels (sick). Students will learn to use c at the beginning of most words, k at the beginning of words if the next letter is e or i (Ken, kit) and k at the end of a word following consonants (milk).
Closed Syllable Type – This syllable can only have one vowel
•The vowel is followed by one or more consonants (closed in)
•The vowel sound is short, marked with a breve. ă ĕ ĭ ŏ ŭ
• This syllable can be combined with other syllables to make multisyllabic words.
•Underline digraphs in sentences or paragraphs
•Sort words – digraphs vs. blends vs. digraph blends
•Find words with ck at the end
•Mark up closed syllables
Bonus Letter Rule – At the end of a one-syllable word, if the word has one vowel, followed immediately by an f, l, or s at the end, double that consonant. fill puff mess
“Glued” Sounds – letters that keep their individual sound but are glued together. To tap these out, use two or three fingers
“glued” to represent the number of sounds working together. all, am, an, ang, ing, ong, ung, ank, ink, onk, and unk.
Vowel Team – two vowels together that make just one sound. At this time students are introduced to the vowel teams: ai, ee, ey, ay, ea. Students are not expected to master these until later on in Level 2.
•Sort words – bonus letter vs. words without bonus letters
•Find words with glued sounds
•Circle vowel teams in words
Closed Syllable Exception – follow a similar pattern to closed syllables, but have a long vowel sound instead of the expected short vowel sound. There are five exceptions to the closed syllables. Students will learn them as glued sounds – old, ild, ind, old, ost.
Vowel Team – two vowels together that make just one sound. At this time students are introduced to the vowel teams – oi, oy. Students are not expected to master these until later on in Level 2.
•Sort words – closed syllable vs. closed syllable exception •Mark up words that are closed syllable exceptions •Circle vowel teams in words
Review Suffixes: –s, -es, -ed, and –ing
New Suffixes: –er and –est, as well as two additional sounds for –ed, /d/ and /t/
Vowel suffixes – begin with a vowel -es, -ed, -ing, -est, -er
Consonant suffixes – begin with a consonant –s
Baseword – also called the root
Students will learn to isolate, say, and spell the baseword before adding the suffix.
Vowel Team - two vowels together that make just one sound. At this time students are introduced to the vowel teams – oa, ow, ou, ue, oe, ow, ou, ue, oo, ew. Students are not expected to master these until later on in Level 2.
•Sort words - vowel suffixes vs. consonant suffixes
•Circle vowel teams in words
•Mark up words with suffixes
Syllables – Words are made up of parts called syllables. Sounds go together to make each part. Each syllable is one push of breath.
Compound Words – two words together that combine to make a longer word.
•In order to divide compound words into syllables, we simply divide
between the two words (hand bag, chest nut)
•Divide between two consonants (hap pen, gob lin) •Do not split-up
digraphs (rock et, eth nic)
•For now, when there is only one consonant between two vowels, that consonant is needed to close in the first syllable. (rel ish, ton ic)
•Blend stays together in second syllable (mat tress, hun dred)
New Suffixes – 4 new consonant suffixes: -ness, -less, -ment, -ful 3 new vowel suffixes: -able, -ish, -en
Using –ic at the end of multisyllabic words – Multisyllabic words ending with the /ik/ sound are spelled with –ic not –ick.
Vowel Team – Students are introduced to the vowel teams au and aw.
Students are not expected to master these until later on in Level 2.
•Sort words with vowel suffixes and consonant suffixes
•Sort words by syllable division rules they follow
•Sort words that use ick or ic at the end
Vowel-Consonant-e Syllable- This syllable has a vowel, then a consonant, then an e.
•The first vowel is long. To indicate the long sound, the vowel is
•This syllable can be combined with other syllables to make
Two sounds for u in a v-e syllable - /ū/ as in mule (or use, cute) or /ü/ as in rule (or tube, June) S can say /z/ - when added to a word as suffix or when it is between two vowels, as in the words nose, rose, or wise.
Spelling Options – Sometimes two spellings make sense: ex. rose and roze
Decide which looks correct. If you don’t know, FIND OUT
Vowel-Consonant-e Syllable Exception - The letter v does not end words in our language. It is always followed by a silent e. Ex: give, have
•Sort words – vowel-consonant-e syllables vs. vowel-consonant-e syllable
•Scoop multisyllabic words and mark up syllable type •Spell words in
•Sort words – ive (long /ī/) vs. ive (short /ĭ/) vs. ive (suffix)
•Find words where s says the /z/ sound
Open Syllable – The vowel can say its name because there is nothing
Y as a vowel – Y often works as a vowel in open syllables, saying long /ī/ at the end of one syllable words (cry) and long /ē/ at the
end of multisyllabic words (baby)
New Syllable Division Rule – If there is only one consonant between two vowels, try dividing the word both ways in order to find the correct division. Ex: fi nal, fin ish
New Suffixes – one new vowel suffix (-y) that says long /ē/ two consonant suffixes (-ly, -ty)
•Sort words by syllable types (closed vs. open) •Circle words where y is acting as a vowel •Practice dividing multisyllabic words
R-Controlled Syllable - contains a single vowel followed by an r
New Keywords for ar and or
•ore makes the same sound as or even though it is a v-e, not an rcontrolled syllable
•o-r is used at the beginning or middle of a word •o-r-e is used at the end of a word
•Sort words by syllable types (r-controlled and non r-controlled)
•Circle words with ar and or in them
•Practice dividing multisyllabic words
R-Controlled Syllable - contains a single vowel followed by an r. New
keywords for er, ir, and ur er her /er/ ir bird /er/ ur burn /er/
Er, ir, and ur all make the same sound. Spelling Option - Sometimes
more than one spelling makes sense: ex: ferst, first, furst
Decide which looks correct. If you don’t know, FIND OUT.
At the end of a word with more than one syllable, /er/ is spelled with
•Sort words by syllable types (r-controlled and non r-controlled)
•Circle words with er, ir and ur in them
•Practice the spelling option procedure
Double Vowel Syllable or “D” Syllable- This syllable contains a vowel
digraph or diphthong. These are vowel teams.
Vowel Digraph: Two vowels together that represent one sound (ee)
Diphthong: A sound that begins with one vowel sound and glides into another (oi)
*It is not necessary that students know the difference between a vowel digraph and diphthong.
Homophones – these are two words, spelled two different ways with two different meanings but sound the same.
•Sort words by syllable types (D syllable and non-D syllable)
•Circle words with ai and ay in them
•Make a list of homophones
Practice with New Vowel Teams: ee, ea, ey •All have the long /e/ sound
•All are found in double vowel syllables •Use the spelling option procedure with these vowel teams •ey can only be used at the end of a word •ea and ee are generally found in the middle of a syllable Note: ea can also make a short /ĕ/ sound as in bread, and a long /ā/ sound as in steak. These sounds will not be introduced until Fundations Level 3.
•Practice the spelling option procedure for words with a long /ē/ sound
•Circle words with ee, ea, and ey in them.
Practice with New Vowel Teams: oi and oy
Both vowel combinations make the /oi/ sound
•oy is used only at the end of a syllable
•oi is used at the beginning or middle of a syllable.
•Practice marking up syllable types
•Circle words with oi and oy in them.
Practice with New Vowel Teams: oa, oe, ow
•All of these vowel teams make the long /ō/ sound.
•The ow combination can also make the /ou/ sound, but that will not be practiced until the next unit.
•Use the spelling option procedure with these vowel teams
Students will also review suffixes in this unit.
•Sort words by syllable types
•Circle words with oa, oe, and ow in them
•Practice the spelling option procedure for words with a long /o/ sound
Practice with New Vowel Teams: ou, ow
•Both vowel teams say /ou/
•Some of the double vowels have more than one pronunciation. In this case, ow says one sound in now and a different sound in know
•ou is only used at the beginning or in the middle of a word or syllable.
•ow can be used in the middle or at the end of a word or syllable.
•Practice marking up syllable types
•Circle words with ou and ow in them.
New Keywords for oo, ue, ou, ew
•oo – school •ue – blue AND ue – rescue •ou – soup •ew – chew
(The other sound for oo, as in book, will not be taught until Level 3.)
•Sort words by syllable types
•Circle words with oo, ue, ou, and ew in them
•Practice the spelling option procedure for words with a long /u/ sound and /u/
Practice with New Vowel Teams: au, aw
•Both vowel teams make the sound as in August and saw.
•In some areas of the country this sound is pronounced as a short o. Words like Don and Dawn would therefore rhyme. If this is the case with your dialect, there would then be three spellings for the short o sound.
•Sort words by syllable types
•Circle words with au and aw in them
•Practice marking up syllables
Consonant-le Syllable •This syllable has only three letters: a consonant, an l, and an e.
•The e is silent. It is the vowel. Every syllable needs at least one vowel. The consonant and the l are sounded like a blend.
Once again e volunteers to be in a syllable without making a sound
(just like it did in the v-e syllable.)
•Sort words by syllable types (Consonant-le syllable and non consonant-le syllable)
•Circle words with –le at the end
•Practice marking up syllables
Sours: https://sites.google.com/a/millstone.knj.us/mrs-peck-s-2nd-grade-webpage/fundations
FUN Phonics Practice Videos: Long Vowels with Sound

Level 1

Listen

Level 1 of Fundations® reinforces the basic skills that were learned in Kindergarten and progresses further into the study of word structure. Teachers should combine Fundations with a wide variety of text experiences, and expose students to poetry, narrative and informational text.

By the end of Level 1, students will be able to:

  • Segment syllables into sounds (phonemes)–up to 5 sounds
  • Name sounds of primary consonants, consonant digraphs, and short and long vowels when given letters
  • Name and write corresponding letter(s) when given sounds for consonants, consonant digraphs, and short and long vowels
  • Print all uppercase and lowercase letters
  • Distinguish long and short vowel sounds
  • Name sounds for r-controlled vowels
  • Name sounds for vowel digraphs and vowel diphthongs
  • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words
  • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions
  • Read and spell the first high frequency words, including irregular words (trick words)
  • Identify word structures such as blends, digraphs, basewords, suffixes, syllable types (closed and vowel-consonant-e syllables)
  • Read and spell CVC, CCVC, CVCC, CCVCC, CVCe words
  • Read and spell compound words and other words with two syllables by breaking them into syllables
  • Read and spell words with -s, -es, -ed, -ing suffixes when added to non-changing basewords
  • Apply correct punctuation (period, question mark, exclamation point)
  • Apply capitalization rules for beginning of sentences and names of people, places and dates
  • Explain major differences between fictional stories and informational text
  • Explain narrative story structure including characters, settings and main events
  • Retell key details of a fictional story and demonstrate understanding
  • Use illustrations and/or details in a story to describe its characters, settings, and events
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text
  • Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text
  • Identify specific words in a story that tell or suggest details
  • Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text
  • Identify the main topic and retell key details of informational text
  • Identify and explain new meanings for familiar words and newly taught words
  • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts
  • Construct complete sentences using vocabulary words
  • Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase
  • Identify frequently occurring root words (e.g., look) and their inflectional forms (e.g., looks, looked, looking)
  • Sort words into categories to gain a sense of the concept the category represents
  • Define words by category and by one or more key attributes
  • Apply beginning dictionary skills
  • Identify real-life connections between words and their use
  • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future
  • Read controlled stories with fluency, expression and understanding

Do your rising first graders need extra support before beginning the Level 1 curriculum? Consider Fundations Ready to Rise&#x; Level 1 for rising first graders. 

Sours: https://www.wilsonlanguage.com/programs/fundations/overview/curriculum/level-1/

Vowel fundations sounds long

.

What are the Long Vowel Sounds?

.

Similar news:

.



272 273 274 275 276