Uad 88rs

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Thread: Neve 88RS - How do you use it?

The 88RS is certainly not lacking character. It's just not of the "dirty" kind. I would describe it as fat, warm, smooth and gentle. It's especially apparent with the mic pre engaged.
Does it work on everything? Yes. Is it ideal on everything? No.

Even though it's probably the most versatile of the strips it can sound way too tamed and bland for tracks that needs a bit of edge to them. I wouldn't just throw it on every track just for the sake of it. As with anything, use it with a purpose.

I personally love the 88RS. It's my go-to for vocals, and I use it a lot on various other sources. The compressor on it is just wonderful, as is the EQ even though I've never gotten along well with the layout of it for some reason.
The only part I've never really cared for is the gate. Which on paper is great, but I find it much to fiddly to set it right and the huge jump in release time certainly doesn't help.

Sours: https://uadforum.com/

Neve® 88RSTM Channel Strip Collection

Neve’s premier analog console expertly emulated – featuring Unison™ mic preamp modeling.

The Neve 88 Series is a paragon of large-format analog console design. Introduced in 2001, the 88 Series is renowned for its startling depth, airiness, and clarity — deftly encompassing the best of all Neve designs that came before it. Not surprisingly, Neve 88 Series consoles are found in some of the world’s finest studios and scoring stages, including Skywalker Ranch and Capitol.

Now for the first time, you can track through an authentic emulation of this modern masterpiece — complete with its famous mic/line preamp, cut filters, dynamics, four-band EQ, plus post-fader output amplifier — exclusively for UAD-2 hardware and Apollo interfaces.

Now You Can:

Sculpt your mix with Neve’s premium large-format analog console sound

Get the clarity and openness of Neve’s famous 88RS transformer-based mic preamp

Shape your signals with legendary Neve 88RS Formant Spectrum EQ and Dynamics sections

Control Apollo interface mic preamp gain staging and impedance directly from the plug-in via Unison™ technology

Mix with artist presets from Jimmy Douglass, Andrew Dawson, Joey Waronker, and Ryan West

Create a modern Neve analog console in your DAW

Take a Listen

Learn how to Give Acoustic Guitars Clarity

Grammy-winning engineer, F. Reid Shippen (Dierks Bentley, Keith Urban) and the Neve 88RS Channel Strip plug‑in.

The only end-to-end Neve 88RS Channel Strip Circuit Emulation

Universal Audio’s all-new Neve 88RS Channel Strip for Apollo and UAD-2 precisely emulates the unique circuit behaviors of Neve’s flagship large-format mixer. Modeling the mic/line preamp, cut filters, dynamics, four-band EQ, plus post-fader output amplifier with fanatical detail, the Neve 88RS Channel Strip plug-in replicates the luxurious, high-fidelity sound of Neve's ultimate mixing console.

Unison Technology for Apollo

Harnessing UA’s groundbreaking Unison technology, the Neve 88RS Channel Strip Collection gives you all of the 88RS mic/line preamp’s impedance, gain stage “sweet spots,” and circuit behaviors that have made it the modern benchmark in analog preamp design. The secret is Unison’s bi-directional control and communication from the Neve 88RS plug-in to the physical mic preamps in Apollo. And the results are nothing short of spectacular.

Sculpt with Neve's Formant Spectrum EQ

The 88RS is outfitted with broad range, minimum-phase 12 dB high and low cut filters to shape any signal during tracking or mixdown. In addition, Neve's famed Formant Spectrum four-band EQ, perfect for ambitious tonal strokes or precise surgery, offers classic Neve color on any source.

Crush or Expand with Neve Dynamics

With versatile and musical VCA-type limit/compress and gate/expand modules, the 88RS’ dynamics sections can precisely tailor any source; transparently smoothing a lead vocal, bringing excitement and immediacy to a percussion bus, or even providing frequency-dependent gain reduction for de-essing.

Add Depth and Openness with any UAD hardware

Of course, the Neve 88RS Channel Strip Collection isn’t just for Apollo owners. UAD-2 owners can use the Neve 88RS Channel Strip for amplification, EQ tone shaping, dynamics control, or adding the Neve sheen to any source, without going outside the box. With the Neve 88RS Channel Strip's complete console channel emulation, plus the included DSP-lite Neve 88RS Channel Strip Legacy, you can craft your projects with the stunning analog clarity of the 88RS.

“Just running signals through the UAD Neve 88RS plug-in without any dynamics or EQ engaged, adds a beautiful, warm character. Driving the gain on the preamp sounds legit too. I’m excited to mix with it as a virtual console.”
– Joey Waronker(Atoms for Peace, Beck, Other Lives)

“The new UAD Neve 88RS plug-in is the channel strip I call home. It has all of the warmth and color of the analog console and its mic preamp is simply as sweet as it gets — I love it for vocals.”
– Jimmy Douglass(Pharrell, Timbaland, John Legend)

“The UAD Neve 88RS Channel Strip has changed my sound completely. Now my drums have that bottom end that sits perfectly in the mix.”
– Hector Delgado(A$AP Rocky, Selena Gomez, Jay-Z)

“The Neve 88RS plug-in is emulated with astonishing precision. You can get tons of character by driving the input gain and using the EQ and dynamics to shape sounds with accuracy. It sounds and feels like the real-deal console to my ears.”
– Ryan West(Eminem, Kanye West, Kid Cudi)

“The UA Neve 88RS gives me the same butt-kicking power that I get from the console... It's the sound I'd expect from a real Neve.”
– Ryan West(Eminem, Kanye West, Kid Cudi)

Watch The Reviews

5-Minute UAD Tips

Neve 88RS Channel Strip Collection

Customer Reviews

M. O'Brien

October 15, 2021

I ran out of stars for this one.

Neve are the best at what they do. This sounds like Neve and that is all I can ask for.

Read More

A. Salganik

September 16, 2021

Great quality wow

Great quality wow

Read More

A. Salganik

September 16, 2021

Great quality wow

Great quality wow

Read More

C. Wang

July 26, 2021

this plugin is amazing!!

just buy it. no shit

Read More

L. Sharman

July 20, 2021

Nice one

This is all I need for the mix

Read More

N. Starcev

June 20, 2021

For me, the Neve version is better.

Compared both versions of the channel strip (SSL4000 NEVE88Rs) while recording the microphone unison. Won the Neve. Juicy mids and a sort of crisp top! It's amazing! Although logically,...

Read More

See All Reviews

Sours: https://www.uaudio.com/uad-plugins/channel-strips/neve-88rs-collection.html
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andrew montreal's Avatar
 


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🎧 10 years

UAD Neve 88rs vs DMG/FabFilter


Hi all,

I have been testing the UAD Neve 88rs mkii and am highly impressed. In terms of EQ, I am finding it less charactered than my other EQs (API, Pultec, Chandler) and I appreciate that. It got me thinking, how does it compare tonally to purely digital EQ’s like DMG’s Equilibrium and Fab Filter’s Pro-Q2?


Last edited by andrew montreal; 27th December 2017 at 09:09 PM..

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andrew montreal's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Any thoughts? I would appreciate understanding what people understand (or hear) when comparing the non-character of the 88rs vs the non-character of digital EQs. And by non-character I mean that people seem to describe the 88rs and less chartered than 1073s, 550s, Pultecs, so on. Does the 88rs have a character?

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UnderTow's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 15 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by andrew montreal➡️

Hi all,

I have been testing the UAD Neve 88rs mkii and am highly impressed. In terms of EQ, I am finding it less charactered than my other EQs (API, Pultec, Chandler) and I appreciate that. It got me thinking, how does it compare tonally to purely digital EQ’s like DMG’s Equilibrium and Fab Filter’s Pro-Q2?

From my understanding UA only model non-linearities for the pre-amp and the output transformer in the UAD Neve 88RS mkii. So you get the EQ curves from the original but other than that it should be a clean digital EQ.

Alistair

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andrew montreal's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

So might we say that unlike something coloured like the 1073 Mkii which I find difficult to mimic with a clean digital EQ (and I own a pair of actual hardware 1073’s), the subtle effect of the components of an pretty clean channel like the 88rs, won’t necessarily make a big difference when working in the box. That in terms of EQ (the great gate and comp aside), mixing with this plugin and say Equlibrium, won’t be much different?

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UnderTow's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 15 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by andrew montreal➡️

So might we say that unlike something coloured like the 1073 Mkii which I find difficult to mimic with a clean digital EQ (and I own a pair of actual hardware 1073’s), the subtle effect of the components of an pretty clean channel like the 88rs, won’t necessarily make a big difference when working in the box. That in terms of EQ (the great gate and comp aside), mixing with this plugin and say Equlibrium, won’t be much different?

Well... in the case of the 88rs the EQ is between the input and output stages so that will have some effect on the sound. You could of course use other tools that do something similar and insert Equilibrium in between them, assuming there are plugins that have similar non-linearities to the 88rs input and output stages.

Another very important aspect are the EQ curves. Equilibrium includes curves based on the Neve 88. I don't know if Pro-Q2 has these.

And lastly, by virtue of the different user interfaces, you might make different mix decisions based on which tool you are working with. Workflow is IMO quite an important aspect of these tools. Personally I am not a fan of these virtual channel strips. I prefer having the separate elements as separate tools but you might prefer working with channel strips. YMMV


Alistair

Used for completely different tasks imo. The Neve, speaking about the eq only, although cleaner than most console channelstrips, does add some of its characteristics to the signal. So it may or may not work in mastering situations or a bit lack luster during mixing depending on how everthing was tracked. Equilibrium as stated above will allow you access to a plethora of curve options as well as being able to get very surgical. Also has an analyzer as well as solo/listen options. Wont color the signal as the 88rs does. All this to say in general you may come to different eq choices based on these differences alone.

Personally I would prefer to have both.

I have the UAD Neve 88RS Mkii, along with 1073 Mkii, API Vision, API 550 & 650, SSL Mkii and Equilibrium.

Re the UAD stuff, based on the sound and the DSP loads, I am guessing that the RS88 Mkii only adds nonlinearities at the input and output stages, as UnderTow suggested. The EQ is most likely linear (digital - not circuit modeled), designed to match the curves you would get on the hardware; e.g. it is not much different from the Equilibrium using all 88 style bands. If so, the biggest tonal differences would come from the EQ implementation, like the DSP choices in Equilibrium - IIR, FIR > MP, ZL-Analog, Analog, Linear Phase options, or with some other DSP difference like calculation Word Length or up-sampling).
Of course UA says it is an 'end-to-end Channel Strip Circuit Emulation', but they have always claimed their plugins were 'exactingly modeled' or whatever - and admittedly, even their earlier plugins sound really good. And with the RS88 Mkii, they again mention the 'Formant Spectrum four-band EQ', a term Neve uses to describe the 88RS EQ section; whether that is an actual implementation of an unusual EQ circuit or a less meaningful term, IDK.

Same with the API Vision, more or less. The API dynamics stage sounds more colored than the RS88 mkii dynamics, so something might be going on there, but sounds to me like the EQ is also a purely digital implementation. I tested this theory by comparing the Vision with its internal EQ to a Vision with an API 550 plugin after it - big difference. The 550 & 560 'Models the entire electronic path, including custom API 2520 op-amps and transformers, band interactions, and internal clipped filter distortion'. I am pretty sure the Vision does not.

The real 'tell' is with the SSL 4000 E Channel Strip, 'an exacting end-to-end circuit emulation '. According to the manual, even the Fader nonlinearities are modeled. It shows, both in the sound and in the DSP usage, which is almost twice the API in mono and more than twice the API in Stereo, a good indication that the whole circuit path is modeled.

Similarly, the 1073 mkii uses a bit more DSP than the 88RS Mkii and almost twice the DPS than the API Vision.

When comparing the depth of circuit modeling with UAD plugins, I always look at the difference between mono & stereo. Notably, both the API Vision and RS88 have only 5 - 6% difference, whereas the Neve 1073 & SSL take almost 30% more (there are a number of reasons for mono vs. stereo DSP usage, from over-sampling to GUI differences to duplication of DSP hungry processing sections - none of these plugins have different GUIs or independent L/R controls, so it comes down to over-sampling and doubling of DSP hungry processing modules).
Plugin-- -- ---- -- ---- -- -- -- mono-- stereo
API Vision Channel Strip . .. .. 22.4% - 29.7%
Neve 88RS Channel Strip . . . 38.3% - 44.2%
Neve 1073 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.1% - 67.6%
SSL E Series Channel Strip . . 41.8% - 70.1%

I also am more about workflow and sound; whatever does the job well with minimum fuss and great sound is a tool worth using.

As for emulating hardware, as DSP power grows, companies will find new ways to get more exacting with their modeling.

One last look at a few products to imagine the possibilities:

The new bx Channels (N, E & G) from Brainworx have tolerance differences between channels (72 choices in all), both in mono and stereo, emulating component tolerance differences (capacitors, resistors, etc.), which can give a mix a spaciousness most other plugins can't (UA for example models a single channel, then duplicates it, so the Left & Right are always the same, given the same settings). Yet their THD comes from a .. THD screw, so apparently not a lot of deep 'circuit modeling' there. If it had TMT andUAD SSL level modeling, it would probably take an i7 down with one instance.

SKnote has a channel strip that lets you add crosstalk across instances, which also give the impression of spaciousness, albeit of a different kind.

5 - 10 years from now, there will be channel strip (and other) plugins that have Tolerance Modeling, Crosstalk anddeep end-to-end circuit modeled behavior. Running on the 2025 Xeon equivalent with UAD 3 cards no doubt.

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UnderTow's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 15 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by virtualaudio➡️

As for emulating hardware, as DSP power grows, companies will find new ways to get more exacting with their modeling.

One last look at a few products to imagine the possibilities:

The new bx Channels (N, E & G) from Brainworx have tolerance differences between channels (72 choices in all), both in mono and stereo, emulating component tolerance differences (capacitors, resistors, etc.), which can give a mix a spaciousness most other plugins can't (UA for example models a single channel, then duplicates it, so the Left & Right are always the same, given the same settings). Yet their THD comes from a .. THD screw, so apparently not a lot of deep 'circuit modeling' there. If it had TMT andUAD SSL level modeling, it would probably take an i7 down with one instance.

SKnote has a channel strip that lets you add crosstalk across instances, which also give the impression of spaciousness, albeit of a different kind.

5 - 10 years from now, there will be channel strip (and other) plugins that have Tolerance Modeling, Crosstalk anddeep end-to-end circuit modeled behavior. Running on the 2025 Xeon equivalent with UAD 3 cards no doubt.
For what its worth, DMG Audio TrackComp already does end-to-end real-time SPICE modelling of every components of the modelled devices. (So that goes much further than what UAD does). I just did a quick test, I can run 192 instances on my 6 year old PC before I start getting drop-outs. So we are pretty much there already.

Btw, I am not convinced about the whole tolerance modelling thing. It basically means random variations per channel. That is not something I want from my tools. (I tested the 1st Brainworx product with this when it came out but was not impressed...)

Alistair

I am not convinced either; but it is at least an approach to what OTB peeps have complained about ITB sound. Can we really expect both channels of a Manley Vari-Mu to have the exact same frequency / phase response & timings? I think that is why plugins lack the dimensionality of hardware (and DAW summing is mathematically prefect to the calculation bit depth). Pick two tubes (same batch and specs) and put them in each side of a Two Channel tube pre.. electrons flowing in a glass vacuum.. subtle yet audible differences, especially when cumulative (I had thought about this before brainworx introduced their TMT.. two channels of any device aren't going to be that exact! We should have a way of tweaking them to create 'real world' differences).
But it's not there yet with most plugins - TMT or whatever. It works - kind of.. but..
I am impressed with the UAD SSL 4000E; blows away their Neve RS88 & API Vision for analog vibe in every section. The API Vision EQs really sound.. digital to me, which led me to the test I mentioned before, using a separate UAD 550 instead of the Vision EQ. Big difference.
BTW, I was looking at TrackComp. I love Equilibrium & Essence and like Dave Gamble's work. Thanks for the recommendation!
GP

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andrew montreal's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Thanks for the input. That was more than I was expecting.

I did experiment further with both channels (SSL and Neve). I was surprised by how engaging they become when pushed hard - really hard... As in overloading. (It fits the production I’m working on presently.) I was curious to see what they bring to the table when doing so. Was surprised by both. Sonically they change drastically... and in an intersting way. Of course, as someone pointed out, if in the case of the 88rs the EQ isn’t involved in that saturation, then other tools could get one there. And with separate tools one can set one’s gain structure more easily.

The clock is ticking with my selection making. Though I did go back to my space to do some more testing, I didnt further compare the UAD Neve 88rs with Equilibrium. And unfortunately as the sale ends this year and I’m with my darling lady till the new year, I won’t have a chance to do so. SO... hmmm...

Pretty sure I’m getting UAD’s:
- SSL 4000 E
- API 2500
- Korg SDD-3000
- Eventide H910

With the API 550/560, Neve 1073, Pultecs, SSL 4000 E, and Clandler Curve Bender PLUS purely digital EQ’s, perhaps I have the EQ’ing covered. New forms of Saturation and distortion might be what are missing from my palette and I’m only realizing that now.

Funny to think... considering most albums I love and the simplicity of the tools they used to make them, we’ve got a lot of tools at our fingertips. Though they are all re-iterations of the same tool (digital EQs).

All that being said, with all those UAD plugins I mentioned there is, oddly enough, still a place for the 88rs. Most of the others are limited in where they can go. And in the case of the SSL (the other channel strip that can reach a plethora of EQ points and curves), the SSL has a different tone for sure.


Last edited by andrew montreal; 30th December 2017 at 05:22 PM..

I have the UAD Neve and SSL emulation.

Since buying Equilibrium I don't use the EQ part of those strips anymore.

To my ears Equilibrium sounds better and the workflow in Equilibrium is far superior to UAD's cartoon GUI's.

I do really like the gate and comp on the 88 though and the gate/exp/comp on the SSL strip.

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UnderTow's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 15 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by virtualaudio➡️

I am not convinced either; but it is at least an approach to what OTB peeps have complained about ITB sound. Can we really expect both channels of a Manley Vari-Mu to have the exact same frequency / phase response & timings? I think that is why plugins lack the dimensionality of hardware (and DAW summing is mathematically prefect to the calculation bit depth). Pick two tubes (same batch and specs) and put them in each side of a Two Channel tube pre.. electrons flowing in a glass vacuum.. subtle yet audible differences, especially when cumulative (I had thought about this before brainworx introduced their TMT.. two channels of any device aren't going to be that exact! We should have a way of tweaking them to create 'real world' differences).
But it's not there yet with most plugins - TMT or whatever. It works - kind of.. but..
I am impressed with the UAD SSL 4000E; blows away their Neve RS88 & API Vision for analog vibe in every section. The API Vision EQs really sound.. digital to me, which led me to the test I mentioned before, using a separate UAD 550 instead of the Vision EQ. Big difference.

I don't want to turn this into another ITB vs OTB debate so I will respectfully disagree and leave it at that.

Quote:

BTW, I was looking at TrackComp. I love Equilibrium & Essence and like Dave Gamble's work. Thanks for the recommendation!
GP

Yes Dave makes some of the absolute best plugins on the market!

Alistair

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andrew montreal's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by thehightenor➡️

I have the UAD Neve and SSL emulation.

Since buying Equilibrium I don't use the EQ part of those strips anymore.

To my ears Equilibrium sounds better and the workflow in Equilibrium is far superior to UAD's cartoon GUI's.

I do really like the gate and comp on the 88 though and the gate/exp/comp on the SSL strip.

Do you feel the same way about the UAD Neve 1073 mkii or their other more charactered plugins?

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pentagon's Avatar

A real 88RS eq is clean. Seems like a lot (not all) of posters on this thread don't understand that. It isn't meant to be a 1073 or API. Comparing it to those is silly for "analog vibe."
Is it "digitally" clean? no -- but that's because it is analogue.
As for EQuilibrium -- it models eqs (and also offers a digitally clean option.) Comparing to a UAD emulation seems a bit daft because the question is "Which EQuilibrium model are you talking about?"

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andrew montreal's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by pentagon➡️

A real 88RS eq is clean. Seems like a lot (not all) of posters on this thread don't understand that. It isn't meant to be a 1073 or API. Comparing it to those is silly for "analog vibe."
Is it "digitally" clean? no -- but that's because it is analogue.
As for EQuilibrium -- it models eqs (and also offers a digitally clean option.) Comparing to a UAD emulation seems a bit daft because the question is "Which EQuilibrium model are you talking about?"

Perhaps I was not being clear with my thread. I was not asking about how similar is one to the other. I am asking people if in their actual experience they found a need for the EQ of the 88rs when they already have high end digital EQ’s considering how clean the 88rs is. How different is a virtual version of a clean analog EQ to a high end digital EQ? Not so silly to compare.

After much experimenting I have chosen not to buy it. On the other hand, the SSL, when pushed, brings out new tones that I can’t get with my other units (and happens to fit perfectly with the project I’m working on presently).
Sours: https://gearspace.com/board/
Recording Engineer, Steve Genewick at Capitol Studios - Neve 88RS

UAD Helios & Neve 88RS | F. Reid Shippen

 

 

Watch the full video here

 

On most plug-ins, what you see is what you get—the controls behave as labeled. But occasionally, there's more than meets the eye, or should we say, "the ear." Engineers working on hardware processors and consoles sometimes discovered additional functionality that was possible because of unintended quirks in the circuitry. Because many plug-in emulations accurately emulate the original circuitry, those "hidden" functions are often available in the software versions.

In this free excerpt from the video F. Reid Shippen Mixing Dierks Bentley's "Drunk On A Plane" (pureMix Pro Members can watch the full video) Shippen lets us in on several such functions on a couple of plug-ins, the UAD Helios 69 Legacy and the Neve 88RS Legacy.

A view of the Pro Tools Edit window from Shippen’s mix.

WHAT'S UP WITH THAT?

We pick up the action with Shippen processing an electric guitar melody line with the UAD Helios 69 Legacy EQ plug-in. There are a couple of hidden functions involving this plug-in, he explains. The first one involves the midrange gain control: When it's turned between 10 and 15, it adds a lot of character to the sound. He proves his point by dialing in such a setting and playing the audio.

Here's a UAD Helios 69 Legacy plug-in, with Shippen's settings from the video.

A second "trick" with the same plug-in involves the Bass frequency-select knob. Shippen explains that when you turn it above 0, even with the Gain knob all the way down, it adds thickness to the sound in a pleasing way. He says it's a great way to add fullness to a guitar track.

He mentions that at first, the UAD emulation didn't reproduce this quirk, because the software designers felt that was wrong for the bass to be boosted if the gain remained at zero. However, in subsequent versions of what's now called the Helios 69 Legacy plug-in, it was put back in.

BELIEVE IN THE NEVE

Shippen next demonstrates a technique for EQing acoustic instruments that uses the UAD Neve 88RS Legacy channel strip. It involves cutting high end using the high-cut filter, and then replacing those highs by boosting the high-frequency band of the equalizer. He says it tames the high end and therefore leaves room for the other instruments in that frequency range (which there are plenty of in country music—fiddle, mandolin, pedal steel etc.), while at the same time allowing the articulations of the instrument it's inserted on to come through.

He demonstrates the technique on a mandolin track. Shippen explains that this behavior of the 88RS EQ was initially discovered on Neve VR-series consoles. He says that he doesn't use the dynamics section of the plug-in for this setting (presumably he's using a different compressor), and almost nothing on the rest of the EQ. He says the high-cut should be set to about 8.5kHz, and the high-frequency setting should be between 8 and 12kHz, whatever sounds best for the instrument you're processing.

The cut-and-boost technique Shippen demonstrates was originally discovered on a Neve VR console.

FURTHER EXPLORATION

In the video, Shippen uses the older, "Legacy" versions of the two UAD plug-ins, which are still available, but have been replaced by newer emulations. UAD redesigned the Helios 69 with a nifty new GUI that's much larger and vertically oriented, rather than horizontal oriented. The midrange Gain knob no longer has the numbers on it, which is more faithful to the original hardware, of which there are both rackmount and 500-series versions.

The new version of the UAD Helios 69 has a spiffy new GUI, but can you do Shippen's "tricks" on it?

Truer to the hardware version, the new UAD Helios 69 doesn't have numbers on the gain controls, so setting it between 10 and 15 as Shippen did on the Legacy plug-in, which has such numbers, isn't as easy. You can still approximate Shippen's settings on the new plug-in, however, and it still sounds excellent. Shippen's second trick, the fattening by turning the bass frequency knob to 60Hz without gain boost doesn't seem to work on the new version, for whatever reason.

UAD includes the Helios 69 Legacy plug-in when you purchase the new version, so you can still get it if you want to do Shippen's tricks. What's more, according to UAD, the newer version features an even closer circuit emulation of the original and contains UADs Unison Technology, which, among other advantages, allows you to track through it if you have an Apollo interface.

UAD's new version of the Neve 88RS adds a Neve mic preamp emulation. Like the new Helios, you can track through it with an Apollo. You should still be able to do Shippen's "cut and boost" technique with it, since it closely mimics the circuitry of the original console channel strip which the technique was developed.

GIVING IT A TRY

We decided to try Shippen's tricks for the UAD Helios 69 Legacy and UAD Neve 88RS Legacy plug-ins on some other tracks to see how they sounded.

Example 1: This guitar example was recorded DI and has a Scruffham S-Gear 2 amp and cabinet emulation of a '57 Bassman inserted on it, as well as the Helios 69 Legacy. You'll hear the section play three times. The first time is without the Helios plug-in. The second time is with it on—with the midrange gain turned between 10-15 and the frequency set to 3.5. The third time the "no gain" bass boost is engaged as well, to fatten it up.

The next three examples feature acoustic guitar and mandolin tracks that are processed with Shippen’s “filter the highs while boosting them” technique using the UAD Neve 88RS Legacy. Each example plays twice: The first time without the EQ and filters in the plug-in bypassed, and the second time with them active.

Example 2a: The acoustic guitar only.

Example 2b: The mandolin only.

Example 2c: Both together.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

One final note. Although most plug-ins don't offer hidden tricks like those Shippen showed, you can get maximum benefits from any plug-in by thoroughly learning its functionality. If your use of a plug-in is limited to selecting presets and making small tweaks, you probably won't be harnessing its full power.

It's beneficial to work with your plug-ins even when you're not doing an actual project. Think of it like practicing an instrument. The more you understand the features and behaviors of your plug-ins, the better you'll be at using them to manipulate your music to meet your creative vision.

Start by reading through the whole manual. Boring, perhaps, but useful for understanding what all the knobs and buttons do.

Next, record some tracks of the type you might use the processor for—or use old tracks from previous projects you've done—and put the plug-in through its paces. Experiment with all the controls and see how they affect the sound. If the plug-in is an emulation of a hardware processor, Google the original and find out what you can about how it was used and what it was known for.

If you have a relatively large collection of plug-ins, consider only using a select group of them regularly, until you've gotten really comfortable with their functionality. For instance, if you've got three channel strip plug-ins in your collection, pick your favorite and use it exclusively until you know it backwards and forwards. Sometimes having too many processors to choose from can make you into a "jack of all trades, master of none."

Sours: https://www.puremix.net/blog/f-reid-shippens-uad-helios-neve-88rs.html

88rs uad

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UA Mixing - UAD Helios + Neve 88RS - Mix With Universal Audio Recording System

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