Netgear switch

Netgear switch DEFAULT

How to Install Netgear's Fast Ethernet Switch

Like a router, a network switch enables you to create small workgroups, or LANs, with multiple computers. A switch even looks like a router; however, unlike a router, it does not provide routing for broadband cable or DSL Internet connections. You add a switch to a router when you need to obtain more Ethernet ports to connect additional computers to a shared Internet connection. Whether you add a Netgear Fast Ethernet Switch to a router or set up the device as a standalone hub, installing it is relatively straightforward.

Step 1

Place the switch on a flat surface in a well-ventilated area and out of direct sunlight.

Step 2

Connect the first RJ-45 Ethernet cable to "Port 1" on the rear of the Netgear switch. Connect the other end of the Ethernet cable to LAN or Network port on the rear of the computer. Note that if using a laptop computer, the LAN or Network port may be on the side of the unit.

Step 3

Connect other computers to the switch as needed using Ethernet cables.

Step 4

Connect the AC power adapter to the switch, and then plug the other end into an available electrical outlet. Connect the AC power adapter; the Netgear switch powers on automatically and is ready for use.

References

Tips

  • You can daisy-chain Netgear switches if one does not have an adequate number of ports to network all the computers in your LAN. Run an Ethernet cable from the last port on the switch with a full complement of connected computers to the first port on the next switch, then connect additional computers to the second switch.
  • You can also use a Netgear router to add ports to a router for sharing an Internet connection. Run an Ethernet cable from the first port on the switch to an open network port on the router. After connecting the Netgear switch to the router, you can connect additional PCs to the network. Computers connected to the switch receive IP addresses and Internet connectivity just as they would if they were connected directly to the router.
  • Unlike routers, switches cannot assign IP addresses to computers. To share files and folders between computers, the PCs must all be members of the same workgroup and use IP addresses in the same range. Consequently, to create a network that allows file and printer sharing with just a switch, you must assign IP addresses to each computer on the LAN manually.

Writer Bio

Jeff Grundy has been writing computer-related articles and tutorials since 1995. Since that time, Grundy has written many guides to using various applications that are published on numerous how-to and tutorial sites. Born and raised in South Georgia, Grundy holds a Master of Science degree in mathematics from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Sours: https://itstillworks.com/install-netgears-fast-ethernet-switch-12287671.html

Identifying Netgear GS724T switch version

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The Netgear GS724T AVB network switch exists in two different hardware revisions: v3 and v4. In some cases, it is important to know which version of the switch you're dealing with.  This article explains a few different ways to identify the version of your Netgear switch.

Note that v3 and v4 switches cannot coexist on the same network; all Netgear GS724T switches on a single network must be the same version.

Labels

It is sometimes possible to identify the switch version from physical labels on the switch.  GS724Tv3 switches have a small label on the rear of the chassis that identifies them as such:

v3label.png

Note that GS724Tv4 switches do not have a label on the rear of the switch.

Web interface

It is also possible to identify the switch version by connecting to the switch and accessing its web interface.  Follow these instructions to connect:

  • Ensure that your computer's IP address is set correctly so that it has access to the switch.  The switch's default IP address is 192.168.0.239, or it will accept an IP address from a DHCP server, if one is present. (If a DHCP server is giving the switch an IP address, you may need to use Netgear's SmartControlCenter software to discover the switch's IP address.)
  • Using your web browser, navigate to the IP address of the switch.  The default is 192.168.0.239.
  • Log in with the password.  The default is “password”.
  • On the initial page that appears after logging in, locate the "Versions" table and check the "Model Name" listed there to determine if you have a v3 or a v4 switch.

v4

Sours: https://support.biamp.com/Tesira/AVB/Identifying_Netgear_GS724T_switch_version
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  5. Neo tokyo blu ray

Netgear ProSAFE GS105 5Port Copper Gigabit Switch

The NETGEAR® ProSAFE® Gigabit Unmanaged Switch series helps businesses cost-effectively expand their network to Gigabit speeds and higher port counts. The GS105 and GS108 Gigabit Ethernet switches come with 5 and 8 Gigabit copper ports in a desktop metal case and is wall-mountable. These switches are energy efficient, built to last, and rigorously tested to provide the reliability businesses need. 802.1p traffic prioritization and jumbo frame support allow for seamless integration with more sophisticated networks.

Tech Specs


Quick Specs


Device Type

Switch - 5 ports

MAC Address Table Size

8K entries

Features

Full duplex capability, auto-sensing per device, auto-uplink (auto MDI/MDI-X)

Compliant Standards

IEEE 802.3u, IEEE 802.3i, IEEE 802.3z

Dimensions (WxDxH)

6.2 in x 4.1 in x 1 in

System Requirements

Apple MacOS, Novell NetWare, Linux, Microsoft Windows

Manufacturer Warranty

NETGEAR lifetime warranty

Device Type

Switch - 5 ports

MAC Address Table Size

8K entries

Features

Full duplex capability, auto-sensing per device, auto-uplink (auto MDI/MDI-X)

Compliant Standards

IEEE 802.3u, IEEE 802.3i, IEEE 802.3z

Dimensions (WxDxH)

6.2 in x 4.1 in x 1 in

System Requirements

Apple MacOS, Novell NetWare, Linux, Microsoft Windows

Manufacturer Warranty

NETGEAR lifetime warranty

See more tech specsSee less

General


Device Type

Switch - 5 ports

MAC Address Table Size

8K entries

Features

Full duplex capability, auto-sensing per device, auto-uplink (auto MDI/MDI-X)

Compliant Standards

IEEE 802.3u, IEEE 802.3i, IEEE 802.3z

Status Indicators

Collision status, port transmission speed, port duplex mode, power, link OK, link/activity

Expansion / Connectivity


Interfaces

5 x 1000Base-T RJ-45

Power


Power Device

External power adapter

Power Consumption Operational

14.4 Watt

Miscellaneous


Compliant Standards

FCC Class A certified, TUV, C-Tick, cUL, EN 60950, VCCI Class A ITE, UL 60950

Software / System Requirements


OS Required

Apple MacOS, Novell NetWare, Linux, Microsoft Windows

Dimensions & Weight


Manufacturer Warranty


Service & Support

NETGEAR lifetime warranty

Environmental Parameters


Min Operating Temperature

32 °F

Max Operating Temperature

104 °F

Humidity Range Operating

10 - 90%

General


Device Type

Switch - 5 ports

MAC Address Table Size

8K entries

Features

Full duplex capability, auto-sensing per device, auto-uplink (auto MDI/MDI-X)

Compliant Standards

IEEE 802.3u, IEEE 802.3i, IEEE 802.3z

Status Indicators

Collision status, port transmission speed, port duplex mode, power, link OK, link/activity

Expansion / Connectivity


Interfaces

5 x 1000Base-T RJ-45

Power


Power Device

External power adapter

Power Consumption Operational

14.4 Watt

Miscellaneous


Compliant Standards

FCC Class A certified, TUV, C-Tick, cUL, EN 60950, VCCI Class A ITE, UL 60950

Software / System Requirements


OS Required

Apple MacOS, Novell NetWare, Linux, Microsoft Windows

Dimensions & Weight


Manufacturer Warranty


Service & Support

NETGEAR lifetime warranty

Environmental Parameters


Min Operating Temperature

32 °F

Max Operating Temperature

104 °F

Humidity Range Operating

10 - 90%
Sours: https://www.dell.com/en-us/work/shop/netgear-prosafe-gs105-5port-copper-gigabit-switch/apd/a7042611/networking
Netgear GS308 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Network Switch Unboxing and Setup
Netgear GS108 8-Port Switch

The Netgear  an 8-port gigabit Ethernet switch that comes from one of the more mature brands in SMB networking. We purchased the review sample for $50 on Amazon.com which is about $6.25 per port. Much like the other NETGEAR units we have seen, such as the NETGEAR ProSafe GS105 we reviewed earlier this year, the GS108 utilizes a metal chassis making it feel fairly sturdy. Since the switch is an unmanaged gigabit switch, it is a relatively simple device. NETGEAR is seen as a leader in this segment. Let’s see how the GS108 stacks up.

Look and Feel

Overall the NETGEAR GS108 feels sturdy. The metal chassis is rugged enough for most home and office uses. Significantly more than the TRENDnet  TEG-S80g we reviewed recently. Like the NETGEAR GS105, the eight RJ-45 ports are found on the rear of the unit and the status indicators are found on the RJ-45 ports. We generally prefer this method as it is easier to troubleshoot cables if the LEDs are on the same side.

Netgear GS108 8-Port Switch

The chassis design is familiar for those in IT who have seen generations of these switches. Our test version is a V3 product. Power consumption is reasonable as we will see, so there there is no need for an additional active fan. As a result the switch stayed very quiet during testing. The lack of fan also means the switch will have lower power consumption.

Performance Impressions

The NETGEAR GS108 advertises 16gbps switching which is equivalent to what we would expect from eight full duplex gigabit ports (8 ports * 2 gbps per port.) For some users having switching capacity equal to the full speed of all ports will be important but most of these will not be deployed in environments where they are run at 100% 8-port capacity. During switch testing we spend a few days generating “normal” traffic, one port streaming HD Netflix on a PC, four ports backing up files to a NAS that occupied two ports and two servers doing file transfers back and forth. The Gs108 gigabit switch fared well. As an aside, we have been running a NETGEAR GS108NA embedded in a lab wall for over 20 months now and have never needed to reboot it.

Netgear GS108 8-Port Switch Power and Lock

NETGEAR’s metal chassis includes a Kensington lock port. Although this switch may be less expensive than many locks, a lock could be useful. The removal of a switch from a small office can cause business to halt for a period of time until a replacement is found. Certainly this is not a must-have feature but is important if IT policy dictates that a lock must be used.

NETGEAR GS108 Power Consumption

Overall power consumption on the NETGEAR GS108NA was slightly higher than expected. Boot power consumption peaked at 3.4w on the Extech 380803 True RMS power analyzer. Here are some quick stats:

  • Boot power consumption: 3.4w
  • Idle power consumption (no RJ-45 active): 1.5w
  • Idle power consumption (2x RJ-45 active): 2.6w
  • Idle with 8x RJ-45 gigabit links: 6.2w
  • Active power consumption with 2x RJ-45 gigabit links: 3.1w
  • Active power consumption with 8x RJ-45 gigabit links: 6.8w

The figures were captured using relatively short 2 meter CAT6 cables which generally lowers power consumption on modern switches. Specs would lead one to believe that this unit would see sub 5w operating power consumption. On the other hand, we measure at the wall versus the device itself to include loss from power supplies.

Netgear GS108 8-Port Switch Power Adapter

NETGEAR includes a power adapter that aligns in parallel with the North American 2-prong power outlet. On standard power strips, this gives greater flexibility regarding where it can be placed. This is important because at this class/ cost of device, it generally makes sense to just purchase a different switch than a different surge protector/ APC to get the power port layout one needs. In a future revision, we would like to see the adapter streamlined so that it takes up no more footprint on a power strip than a standard 3-prong outlet.

NETGEAR GS108 Features

[tabgroup][tab title=”NETGEAR GS108 Features”]

  • Network Ports

    Forwarding Mode

    • Store-and-forward
    • 192 KB on-chip packet buffering

    Performance

    • Bandwidth: 16 Gbps (non-blocking)
    • Forwarding rate:
      – 10 Mbps port: 14,800 packets/sec
      – 100 Mbps port: 148,000 packets/sec
      – 1000 Mbps port: 1,480,000 packets/sec
    • Latency (using 1500-byte packets):
      – 10 Mbps: 30μs (max)
      – 100 Mbps: 6μs (max)
      – 1000 Mbps: 4μs (max)
    • MAC address database: 4,000
    • Mean time between failures (MTBF):
      >1 million hours (~114 years)

    Status LEDs

    • System power
    • Link, speed, and activity indicators per port built into each RJ-45 port

    AC Power

    • Power adapter: 12W, 12V DC, 1A
    • Maximum power consumption:
      – 4.92W (if cable length > 10 m)
      – 4.08W (if cable length < 10 m)

    Physical Specifications

    • Dimensions (w x d x h):
      158 x 105 x 27 mm (6.2 x 4.1 x 1.1 in)
    • Weight: 0.522 kg (1.15 lb)

    Environmental Specifications

    • Operating temperature: 0º to 50º C (32º to 122º F)
    • Operating humidity: 10% to 90% non-condensing
    • Storage temperature: -20º to 70° C (-4º to 158º F)
    • Storage humidity: 10% to 95% relative humidity

    Standards Compliance

    • IEEE 802.3i 10BASE-T Ethernet
    • IEEE 802.3u 100BASE-TX Fast Ethernet
    • IEEE 802.3ab 1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet
    • Honors IEEE 802.1p and DSCP priority tags
    • Jumbo frame: up to 9,720 bytes

    System Requirements

    • 10 Mbps: UTP Cat 3 (or better)
    • 100 Mbps: UTP Cat 5 (or better)
    • 1000 Mbps: UTP Cat 5e (or better)

    Warranty

    • Switch: NETGEAR Lifetime Warranty
    • Power adapter: NETGEAR 2-year warranty

[/tab][/tabgroup]

Conclusion

Overall, the NETGEAR GS108 is a solid unmanaged gigabit switch. The unmanaged nature means that it will not provide many of the advanced features some administrators may want. It does provide basic switching features including support for jumbo frames. With all of that said, perhaps one of the biggest value points with this switch is the longevity/ stability that these products have had for NETGEAR over the years. While the fact of the matter is that electronic products do have a defect rate, and so there are always going to be some DOA products that get to customers, this line of NETGEAR products is very popular due to the simplicity and reliability.

Patrick Kennedy

https://www.servethehome.com

Patrick has been running STH since 2009 and covers a wide variety of SME, SMB, and SOHO IT topics. Patrick is a consultant in the technology industry and has worked with numerous large hardware and storage vendors in the Silicon Valley. The goal of STH is simply to help users find some information about server, storage and networking, building blocks. If you have any helpful information please feel free to post on the forums.

Sours: https://www.servethehome.com/netgear-gs108-8port-unmanaged-gigabit-switch-review-gs108na/

Switch netgear

NETGEAR GS108E-300NAS ProSAFE Plus 8-Port Gigabit Web Managed Switch

Control and Configure Beyond Plug-N-Play Connectivity

Today's growing businesses demand and rely more on their network to carry out mission-critical business activities. Companies are putting more network traffic and applications such as VoIP phones and IP cameras on their Ethernet infrastructure. It needs the network intelligence to separate the voice and video traffic from data, and prioritize them accordingly. However, companies do not necessarily have more money or advanced training to deal with complex managed switches. NETGEAR ProSAFE® Plus Switches meet this growing need by providing fundamental network features that will help optimize the performance of business networks. On top of the plug-N-play Gigabit Ethernet connectivity, these switches also offer essential networking features such as VLAN, QoS, IGMP Snooping, Link Aggregation (LAG), rate limiting and traffic monitoring. NETGEAR ProSAFE® Plus Switches are an exceptional value for businesses looking to add intelligence to their network beyond what unmanaged switches can provide.

Prioritize Voice/Video

With the ability to set up and configure QoS, these Gigabit Plus Switches can detect different types of network traffic and assign the desired priority to latency-sensitive traffic, such as voice and video. This helps improve the delivery quality of related applications such as VoIP, multimedia broadcasting, and video conferencing.

Build Multiple Network Groups

These Gigabit Plus Switches can help divide big networks into smaller more manageable groups and have resources dedicated for one or several groups rather than making the same resources open to all. This feature improves overall network performance, adds security to network traffic, and makes more efficient use of network resources.Troubleshoot Cable Problems

All Gigabit Plus Switches come with a cable diagnostic feature that enables users to easily find out the health status of their network cables. If there are any problems, this feature helps quickly locate the point where the cabling fails; allowing connectivity issues to be fixed much faster, potentially saving technicians hours of troubleshooting.IGMP Snooping for Optimized Multimedia Traffic Delivery

By listening in on the IGMP conversation between hosts and routers, the Gigabit Plus switch can maintain a map as to which links need which IP multicast streams. The Gigabit Plus switch therefore will be able to forward multicast traffic only to the links that have asked for them and cut multicast traffic from links that do not contain a multicast listener. Essentially, IGMP snooping helps optimize multicast performance at Layer 2 and is especially useful for bandwidth-intensive IP multicast applications such as IPTV.

Sours: https://www.provantage.com/netgear-gs108e-300nas~7NET905X.htm
What is a Network Switch? - NETGEAR Business

Overall experience with Netgear Switches

How helpful reviews are selected

Enterprise Ready. Budget Friendly. SMB Approved.

We utilize the Netgear switches depending on the client's needs and budget. So far Netgear has come through and has exceeded our expectations in the enterprise field. Our latest deployment was a huge success with the customer being fully satisfied as well our network engineers having the confidence to manage the equipment remotely....

Great for smaller environments

We were very curious on this product, great specs, create features and of course price and warrenty was outstanding. but at the end we just went back with Cisco...

See All 96 Product Reviews

Likes and dislikes about Netgear Switches

Cost and efficiency. The NOS is very easy to configure and provides the standard commands that are found in Cisco and HP ARUBA switches. You also have the ability to configure everything via the web which makes these switches great to use in a learning environment such as a school or a lab....

September 9, 2020

the transisiton from what we were doing and how people were actually using the current gear was giving the techs some issues, and not worth the potiental loss of productivity when there is an issue, ...

October 6, 2020

View more likes and dislikes

  • Great for smaller environments

    • Reviewer Role: Infrastructure and Operations
    • Company Size: 50M - 250M USD
    • Industry: Services Industry

    We were very curious on this product, great specs, create features and of course price and warrenty was outstanding. but at the end we just went back with Cisco...

  • Enterprise Ready. Budget Friendly. SMB Approved.

    • Reviewer Role: Infrastructure and Operations
    • Company Size: 3B - 10B USD
    • Industry: Miscellaneous Industry

    We utilize the Netgear switches depending on the client's needs and budget. So far Netgear has come through and has exceeded our expectations in the enterprise field. Our latest deployment was a huge success with the customer being fully satisfied as well our network engineers ......

  • Pretty Solid Product

    • Reviewer Role: Digital Marketing
    • Company Size: 50M - 250M USD
    • Industry: Miscellaneous Industry

    Netgear Community has good people and experienced persons for guiding us for any issues. Netgear Router and Switches are more secure and stable in my view. All product-related firmware and documentation like manual and every drive present in the download page of ......

  • Stable product

    • Reviewer Role: Knowledge Specialist
    • Company Size: 30B + USD
    • Industry: Transportation Industry

    Installing and configuring takes some time but when it works it seems very stable. Updating the firmware is made quite easy....

  • Netgear DataCenter Switches - Good Performance When On Limited Budget

    • Reviewer Role: Infrastructure and Operations
    • Company Size: 250M - 500M USD
    • Industry: Manufacturing Industry

    I have used 10GB Netgears ProCurve switches in our data center for 10GB server communications, for iSCSI SAN storage communication as well as part of HCI solution to have both Hyper-V communication and iSCSI. They work really well, speed and reliability are good, ......

  • A great tool for cloud management of Internet devices

    • Reviewer Role: Sales and Marketing
    • Company Size: 500M - 1B USD
    • Industry: Healthcare Industry

    We have been using Netgear Routers from NETGEAR SWITCHES for quite sometime now. Their remote management and cloud management have worked quite well for us. We can log into the routers interface and can see all of the clients and NETGEAR Switches that are currently ......

  • Consistent Performance and Dependability for 15+ Years

    • Reviewer Role: Marketing Analytics Leader
    • Company Size: 30B + USD
    • Industry: Finance Industry

    I am very pleased with the performance of these switches. We have been using Netgear for over 15 years in both residential and commercial settings. Traffic management is superior increasing overall network performance....

  • Modest in terms of reliability and management

    • Reviewer Role: Knowledge Specialist
    • Company Size: 500M - 1B USD
    • Industry: Services Industry

    We have used Netgear switches for over 5 years in a small to medium size office environment; to that end it had billed up to expectations. Netgear switches are reliable and provide a competent back up to our primary switching solution. Customer service is great so far and ......

  • Good, relaible hardware that handles critical workloads.

    • Reviewer Role: Enterprise Architecture and Technology Innovation
    • Company Size: 250M - 500M USD
    • Industry: Retail Industry

    We have been pleased with the reliability of these switches. They are easy to manage and come with flexible options. We mainly use them for unmanaged network applications but have also used the management utility. It works well....

  • Netgear DataCenter switches - Good performance when on limited budget

    • Reviewer Role: Infrastructure and Operations
    • Company Size: 50M - 250M USD
    • Industry: Miscellaneous Industry

    I have used 10GB Netgears ProCurve switches in our data center for 10GB server communications, for iSCSI SAN storage communication as well as part of HCI solution to have both Hyper-V communication and iSCSI. They work really well, speed and reliability are good, ......

  • Netgear Switches - Relaible, flexible and they just work

    • Reviewer Role: Program and Portfolio Management
    • Company Size: 3B - 10B USD
    • Industry: Transportation Industry

    We chose Netgear switchs as they are worldwide proven brand with good pedigree and have mature products that work well in the enterprise marketspace as well as within any small medium enterprise....

  • Great and solid products which are more secures and reliable compare to competitors

    • Reviewer Role: Digital Marketing
    • Company Size: 1B - 3B USD
    • Industry: Services Industry

    It has provided lifetime warranty with next business at business replacement is very impressive, it helped me managing fully smart switches to next level. The community forums helped a lot for quicker and help from the netgear, the routers and the switches are are very secured and ......

  • "Netgear switches is the new network engine"

    • Reviewer Role: Data and Analytics
    • Company Size: 500M - 1B USD
    • Industry: Communications Industry

    We are Majorly using the Netgear Ethernet switch in our organization and this is one of the most prominent solutions as compared to other companies. The customer support is fantastic they are available 24*7 and all our issues are resolved on high priority. Switches are ......

  • Reliable product, Not much expensive

    • Reviewer Role: R&D/Product Development
    • Company Size: 50M - 250M USD
    • Industry: Communications Industry

    In my overall experience, the speed is very much consistent and reliable, also one thing to be noted is that the setup is easy to install and setup cost is very low. As of now, the switches are more secure and stable in my overall experience. All the documents and manuals are easily ......

  • Netgear datacenter line of switches is definitely worth a look

    • Reviewer Role: Infrastructure and Operations
    • Company Size: 500M - 1B USD
    • Industry: Manufacturing Industry

    The Netgear switch was originally chosen on price specifically, but it did not integrate with some of our other cisco products well enough for our liking. ...

See All 96 Product Reviews

Sours: https://www.gartner.com/reviews/market/data-center-and-cloud-networking/vendor/netgear/product/netgear-switches

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Netgear Smart Switches Open to Complete Takeover

Three severe Netgear vulnerabilities, codenamed Demon’s Cries, Draconian Fear and Seventh Inferno by the researcher that found them, affect 20 of the company’s managed smart switches and could allow an attacker to take them over.

The bugs were patched on Friday with zero technical details made available, but the researcher has now released more details on the first two. Details on the third, Seventh Inferno, will be published after Sept. 13, he said. Netgear tracks the bugs as PSV-2021-0140, PSV-2021-0144 and PSV-2021-0145, but CVEs are pending for all three.

Infosec Insiders Newsletter

If exploited, the gear could allow cyberattackers to gain administrative privileges and completely take over the device, gaining the ability to disrupt corporate communications as well as to pivot to move laterally throughout an enterprise network.

Demon’s Cries Takeover Bug

The Demon’s Cries bug carries a CVSS severity-rating score of 8.8, making it high severity.

According to the researcher, who goes by “Gynvael Coldwind,” an exploit would allow an authentication bypass, resulting in the attacker accessing an admin’s password and achieving full compromise of the device.

The researcher said that the issue exists within the Netgear Switch Discovery Protocol (NSDP), which is implemented by the sqfs/bin/sccd daemon (hence the flaw’s name).

“The protocol itself is UDP-based and each datagram consists of a 32-byte header, followed by a Type/Length/Value chain, with each TLV consisting of a four-byte header (two bytes Type, two bytes Length), followed by the Value bytes,” Coldwind explained in his posting, issued Monday.

By analyzing Netgear administration tools, Coldwind uncovered that any “set” commands (used to define and determine the values of the system environment) require a password-authentication TLV to be first in the datagram.

“However, the sccd daemon on this device DOES NOT enforce this, i.e. the type 10 TLV can be omitted from the chain and in such case neither the password verification takes place, nor does it seem to be required by any of the ‘set’ TLV handlers,” explained Coldwind.

As an example of how this can be exploited, he noted that a “set” command that changes the password on an account to the one specified in the value portion of the header can be sent – and accepted.

“Sending just this one TLV is enough to change the admin password on the device without knowing the previous password,” he said.

Caveats: An attacker needs to already have a foothold on the same corporate network as the target device in order to exploit the vulnerable system. And, to be pwned, a switch must have Netgear’s Smart Control Center (SCC Control) enabled (which it is by default).

Draconian Fear Full-Device Compromise

The second bug carries a 7.4 CVSS rating, making it also high-severity. It’s only exploitable if the attack occurs while an admin is in the process of logging in.

“An attacker with the same IP as a logging-in admin to hijack the session bootstrapping information, giving the attacker full admin access to the device web UI and resulting in a full compromise of the device,” according to Coldwind’s Draconian Fear writeup, also issued on Monday.

The bug exists because in Netgear’s web UI authentication logic, the browser first sends the login information using the “set.cgi” function, and then polls “get.cgi” to get the session ID. However, Coldwind found that get.cgi doesn’t adequately verify if the polling party is actually the same as the party that sent in the login information, because there’s no session cookie that links the set.cgi and get.cgi requests together.

Thus, to exploit the issue, an attacker on the same IP as the admin can just flood the get.cgi function with requests and snatch the session information when it appears, according to the researcher, who added that the window between get.cgi requests on the browser is one second.

“The obvious limiting factor here is the requirement for the attacker to either have the same IP as the admin (foothold on the same machine with limited privileges, same source NAT IP, etc.) or being able to spoof the IP with various low-level network shenanigans, as well winning a race condition with a one-second window (pretty easy actually),” Coldwind said. “[That one second] allows an attacker to send multiple requests effectively greatly increasing the odds of getting the session information before admin’s browser gets it (in my tests the [proof-of-concept exploit] wins the race nine out of 10 times).”

Which Netgear Smart Switches Are Affected?

Coldwind verified the vulnerabilities on the Netgear GS110TPV3 Smart Managed Pro Switch (and others) using firmware version 7.0.6.3 and below. However, the vendor issued an extensive list of affected models in its advisory:

  • GC108P
  • GC108PP
  • GS108Tv3
  • GS110TPP
  • GS110TPv3
  • GS110TUP
  • GS308T
  • GS310TP
  • GS710TUP
  • GS716TP
  • GS716TPP
  • GS724TPP
  • GS724TPv2
  • GS728TPPv2
  • GS728TPv2
  • GS750E
  • GS752TPP
  • GS752TPv2
  • MS510TXM
  • MS510TXUP

Firmware fixes are available for all affected products:

  • GC108P fixed in firmware version 1.0.8.2
  • GC108PP fixed in firmware version 1.0.8.2
  • GS108Tv3 fixed in firmware version 7.0.7.2
  • GS110TPP fixed in firmware version 7.0.7.2
  • GS110TPv3 fixed in firmware version 7.0.7.2
  • GS110TUP fixed in firmware version 1.0.5.3
  • GS308T fixed in firmware version 1.0.3.2
  • GS310TP fixed in firmware version 1.0.3.2
  • GS710TUP fixed in firmware version 1.0.5.3
  • GS716TP fixed in firmware version 1.0.4.2
  • GS716TPP fixed in firmware version 1.0.4.2
  • GS724TPP fixed in firmware version 2.0.6.3
  • GS724TPv2 fixed in firmware version 2.0.6.3
  • GS728TPPv2 fixed in firmware version 6.0.8.2
  • GS728TPv2 fixed in firmware version 6.0.8.2
  • GS750E fixed in firmware version 1.0.1.10
  • GS752TPP fixed in firmware version 6.0.8.2
  • GS752TPv2 fixed in firmware version 6.0.8.2
  • MS510TXM fixed in firmware version 1.0.4.2
  • MS510TXUP fixed in firmware version 1.0.4.2

Netgear Authentication Problems Persist

Netgear gear has had a bevy of authentication flaws in the past, especially when it comes to the vendor’s routers.

For instance, three firmware flaws in the DGN-2200v1 series router were disclosed in July. They can enable authentication bypass to take over devices and access stored credentials using a side-channel attack.

And last year, researchers discovered an unpatched zero-day vulnerability in firmware that put 79 Netgear device models at risk for full takeover. Moreover, the company chose to leave 45 of those models unpatched because they were outdated or had reached their end of life.

It’s time to evolve threat hunting into a pursuit of adversaries. JOIN Threatpost and Cybersixgill for Threat Hunting to Catch Adversaries, Not Just Stop Attacks and get a guided tour of the dark web and learn how to track threat actors before their next attack. REGISTER NOW for the LIVE discussion on Sept. 22 at 2 p.m. EST with Cybersixgill’s Sumukh Tendulkar and Edan Cohen, along with independent researcher and vCISO Chris Roberts and Threatpost host Becky Bracken.

Sours: https://threatpost.com/netgear-smart-switches-takeover/169259/


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