Fat32 ubuntu

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FAT32 formatting

Well this is weird to say the least. I'm guessing your TV's OS has additional requirements beyond simply FAT32. For example Windows XP has limitations on cluster size, number of clusters, and partition size when booting from FAT32 partitions (REF). Perhaps your TV doesn't like the allocation size? If that's not it then I don't know :P. You should check to see what allocation size you use when doing a format with Windows, and then use the same allocation size when formatting with Ubuntu.

Steps:

  1. In your terminal type "".

This will format the entire device as VFAT32 with a 4096 byte allocation size which is commonly used by Windows. If you wish to adjust the size just replace "16" with the required number. Most disks uses 512 bytes sector sizes with the exception of the modern 4K disks (REF). 16x512bytes=4096bytes. You will need to substitute for the correct device and partition (something like ).

VFAT:

VFAT is an extension for FAT filesystem that adds support for long filenames (REF); systems that don't support VFAT but do support the underlying version of FAT will be able to read the partition using the underlying version of FAT (REF). VFAT is most commonly misused to refer to FAT32, but it can be applied to any version of FAT. Files saved to a VFAT partition will have 2 filenames: a short name for being read under FAT, and a long name for being read under VFAT (REF). If the file is renamed while accessed under FAT support then the long name is lost (REF). VFAT accomplishes this 2nd name by splitting the long name across directories; in locations that have a max folder limit you could end up severely limiting the number of files you can create in that directory (REF). The short name is made from the first six characters of the long filename, a tilde, and a number (REF). VFAT is used by default on both Windows 7, and Ubuntu 14.04 when creating FAT32 partitions.

Allocation Size:

Allocation size, also called cluster size is method of grouping sectors within a partition; sectors make up a cluster. Disks have a set number of sectors, and sectors have a specified data size typically 512 bytes (REF). You can think of a cluster as a box. Within that box a single file, or part of a file can be saved. You cannot save more than 1 file in a cluster. Due to this the last cluster used in a series to save a file will have free space remaining that cannot be used by the system for anything else. The amount of space wasted will depend on the size of the file, and size of the cluster. For example a small file of 1KB written to a 64KB cluster will result in 63KB of lost hard drive space. Cluster sizes will also have an impact on write speeds because it takes longer to fill more clusters. When storing large files it's better to use a large cluster size, and when storing small files it's better to have a small cluster size. Most people need a balance that leans towards the small cluster size. Because disks only have a set number of sectors, having larger cluster sizes reduces the number of clusters you can have, and therefore may reduce the number of files you can have.

Sours: https://askubuntu.com/questions/493262/fat32-formatting

Introduction

A disk partition must be formatted and mounted before use. The formatting process can also be done for several other reasons, such as changing the file system, fixing errors, or deleting all data.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to format and mount disk partitions in Linux using ext4, FAT32, or NTFS file system.

How to Format Disk Partitions in Linux

Prerequisites

  • A system running Linux
  • A user account with sudo or root privileges
  • Access to a terminal window / command line (Activities > Search > Terminal)

Checking the Partitions

Before formatting, locate a partition you wish to format. To do so, run the command that displays block devices. Block devices are files that represent devices such as hard drives, RAM disks, USB drives, and CD/ROM drives.

The terminal prints out a list of all block devices as well as information about them:

  • NAME – Device names
  • MAJ:MIN – Major or minor device numbers
  • RM – Whether the device is removable (1 if yes, 0 if no)
  • SIZE – The size of the device
  • RO – Whether the device is read-only
  • TYPE – The type of the device
  • MOUNTPOINT – Device’s mount point

We will use the partition as an example.

Locating partitions with lsblk command.

The command without additional options does not display information about the devices’ file systems.

To display a list containing file system information, add the option:

The terminal prints out the list of all block devices. The partitions that do not contain information on the file system in use are non-formatted partitions.

Locating non-formatted partitions with lsblk -f command.

Note: Consider learning how to create partitions in Linux.


Formatting Disk Partition in Linux

There are three ways to format disk partitions using the command, depending on the file system type:

The general syntax for formatting disk partitions in Linux is:

Formatting Disk Partition with ext4 File System

1. Format a disk partition with the ext4 file system using the following command:

2. Next, verify the file system change using the command:

The terminal prints out a list of block devices.

3. Locate the preferred partition and confirm that it uses the ext4 file system.

The process of formatting disk partition using the ext4 file system in Linux.

Formatting Disk Partition with FAT32 File System

1. To format a disk with a FAT32 file system, use:

2. Again, run the command to verify the file system change and locate the preferred partition from the list.

The expected output is:

Formatting disk partition using FAT32 file system in Linux.

Formatting Disk Partition with NTFS File System

1. Run the command and specify the NTFS file system to format a disk:

The terminal prints a confirmation message when the formatting process completes.

2. Next, verify the file system change using:

3. Locate the preferred partition and confirm that it uses the NFTS file system.

Formatting a partition with NTFS file system in Linux.

Mounting the Disk Partition in Linux

Before using the disk, create a mount point and mount the partition to it. A mount point is a directory used to access data stored in disks.

1. Create a mount point by entering:

2. After that, mount the partition by using the following command:


Note: Replace with the preferred mount point (example:).


There is no output if the process completes successfully.

The process of creating mount point and mounting.

3. Verify if the partition is mounted using the following command:

The expected output is:

Verifying formatting and mounting partition process.

Understanding the Linux File System

Choosing the right file system before formatting a storage disk is crucial. Each type of file system has different file size limitations or different operating system compatibility.

The most commonly used file systems are:

Their main features and differences are:

File SystemSupported File SizeCompatibilityIdeal Usage
FAT32up to 4 GBWindows, Mac, LinuxFor maximum compatibility
NTFS16 EiB – 1 KBWindows, Mac (read-only), most Linux distributionsFor internal drives and Windows system file
Ext416 GiB – 16 TiBWindows, Mac, Linux (requires extra drivers to access)For files larger than 4 GB

Note: Refer to our Introduction to Linux File System article to learn more about the evolution and features of different Linux file systems.


Conclusion

After following this tutorial, you should be able to format and mount a partition in Linux in various file systems. Partition manipulation is essential for efficient data management, and next, we recommend learning how to delete a partition in Linux.

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Sours: https://phoenixnap.com/kb/linux-format-disk
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Provided by: fatresize_1.0.2-10_amd64bug

NAME

fatresize — Resize an FAT16/FAT32 volume non-destructively

SYNOPSIS

fatresize [-sSIZE][device]

DESCRIPTION

This manual page documents briefly the fatresize This manual page was written for the Debian distribution because the original program does not have a manual page.

OPTIONS

These programs follow the usual GNU command line syntax, with long options starting with two dashes (`-'). A summary of options is included below. For a complete description, see the Info files. -h--help Show summary of options. -s--size Resize volume to SIZE[k|M|G|ki|Mi|Gi] bytes -i--info Show volume information -p--progress Show progress -q--quite Be quite -v--verbose Verbose (not version)

EXAMPLES

fatresize -s 2G /dev/evms/hdb2 fatresize -q -s 3G /dev/hde6 fatresize -i /dev/hdg3 Size and device is required to run. You can resize device-mapped partitions, e.g. EVMS partitions.

BUGS

You can't resize FAT32 partition lesser than 512Mb because Windows(R) doesn't work properly with small FAT32 file system. Use FAT16.

AUTHOR

This manual page was written by Philippe Coval [email protected] for the Debian system (but may be used by others). Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU General Public License, Version 2 any later version published by the Free Software Foundation. On Debian systems, the complete text of the GNU General Public License can be found in /usr/share/common-licenses/GPL-2. FATRESIZE(1)
Sours: http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/bionic/man1/fatresize.1.html
форматирование флешки в Ubuntu Linux fat32 to ntfs

Do you need to format a USB device to Fat32 on your Linux PC? Can’t figure out how to format a filesystem? We can help! Follow along as we show you how to How to format a USB device to Fat32 on Linux!

format a USB device to Fat32

Format a USB device to Fat32 – Gnome Disk Utility

The Gnome Disk Utility application is the quickest and simplest way a Linux user can format a USB device to Fat32. The reason? It’s got an easy-to-use UI, supports the Fat32 format, and supports things like “quick format.”

To start the formatting process, you will need to install Gnome Disk Utility on your computer. Sadly, although Gnome Disk Utility comes with many Linux operating systems, it doesn’t ship with all of them.

Using the Ctrl + Alt + T keyboard combination, open up a terminal window on the Linux desktop. Alternatively, open up the app menu, search for “Terminal,” and launch the app that way.

Once the terminal window is open, follow along with the Gnome Disk Utility installation instructions that correspond with the Linux OS you currently use. 

Ubuntu

On Ubuntu, install the Gnome Disk Utility application with the following Apt command below.

sudo apt install gnome-disk-utility

Debian

Those on Debian Linux will be able to install Gnome Disk Utility by making use of the Apt-get command.

sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility 

Arch Linux

If you’re an Arch Linux user, you’ll be able to install Gnome Disk Utility with the Pacman command quickly.

sudo pacman -S gnome-disk-utility

Fedora

On Fedora Linux, the Gnome Disk Utility app may already be installed. However, if it is not, you’ll be able to get it working with the following Dnf command.

sudo dnf install gnome-disk-utility

OpenSUSE 

If you’re using OpenSUSE Linux, you’ll be able to quickly install the Gnome Disk Utility app using the following Zypper command.

sudo zypper install gnome-disk-utility

Format USB device to Fat32

Now that Gnome Disk Utility is installed on your Linux PC search for “Disks” in the app menu. When the app is open, follow the step-by-step instructions below to learn how to format your USB device to Fat32.

Step 1: Plug your USB device into the USB port. Upon plugging it in, you should see it appear in the Gnome Disk Utility sidebar. Look through the sidebar for your device, and click on it with the mouse.

Step 2: After locating your device and clicking on it with the mouse, you’ll see an overview of the USB device. From here, find the Gnome Disk Utility menu, and click on it.

Can’t find the Gnome Disk Utility menu? It’s directly to the left of the minimize button.

Step 3: Inside the Gnome Disk Utility menu, click on the “Format Disk” button. Then, locate the “Erase” menu.

In the “Erase” menu, select either “Quick” or “Slow.” For best results, we recommend the “Slow” option, as it is safer.

Step 4: After choosing an option in the “Erase” menu, find the “Partitioning” menu, and select “Compatible with all systems and devices (MBR/DOS),” and click on it.

Step 5: Under “Volumes” for your device, find the “+” button, and click on it to create a new partition. Upon clicking this button, a “Create Partition” window will appear.

Using the pop-up window, select your partition size, free space, etc. Click on “Next” to move to the next page.

Step 6: On the next page, find the “Volume Name” section and name your volume. Or leave it blank if you so choose.

Locate the “Erase” button, and click on it if you would like to erase the device beforehand. Then, find “Type” and click on”For use with all systems and devices (FAT).

Click “Create” when done.

Step 7: After clicking on the “Create” button, Gnome Disk Utility, your USB device will be formatted to Fat32!

Format a USB device to Fat32 – Mkfs

Another quick way to format a USB device to Fat32 is with the mkfs command in a terminal. To start the process, press Ctrl + Alt + T on the keyboard to open up a terminal. Or, search for “terminal” in the app menu and launch it that way.

Once the terminal window is open, plug in the USB device. Then, execute lsblk in the terminal to view all attached storage devices.

lsblk

Look through lsblk and locate your USB device, and find the device label. In this example, the device label is . Yours will differ! 

Note: can’t figure out how to read lsblk? Check out our guide on how to find hard drive info for help!

When you’ve located your USB device, unmount it if it isn’t already unmounted. You can do this by entering the umount command along with the device label.

sudo umount /dev/sde1

After unmounting the device, use the mkfs.vfat -F32 command to format it to Fat32.

sudo mkfs.vfat -F32 /dev/sde1
Sours: https://www.addictivetips.com/ubuntu-linux-tips/how-to-format-a-usb-device-to-fat32-on-linux/

Ubuntu fat32

Linux – Can Ubuntu Linux be installed on FAT32 or NTFS

Linux relies on a number of filesystem features that simply are not supported by FAT or NTFS -- Unix-style ownership and permissions, symbolic links, etc. Thus, Linux can't be installed to either FAT or NTFS. (It used to be possible to do this using a FAT driver that adds those features, but it was removed from the kernel years ago because nobody was maintaining it.)

If you need a USB flash drive that both boots Linux and can be accessed from Windows, then I second Zonder's recommendation to create a FAT or NTFS data partition on the drive, along with the Linux partition(s). Note that you'll need to put the FAT or NTFS partition first on the disk, because Windows treats USB flash drives as "superfloppies," and will access only the first partition on the disk. Linux is not limited in this way, so you can put the Linux partition(s) after the shared-data partition. Also note that you can't use FAT or NTFS as the Linux partition; if you go this route, you'll need to mount the shared-data partition somewhere else in Linux.

Sours: https://itectec.com/superuser/can-ubuntu-linux-be-installed-on-fat32-or-ntfs/
How to use Partiton Editor in Ubuntu Installer
Many users install Ubuntu as the second operating system on their machine. It is important then to be able to access the data on the Windows partition. By default, the installation will create the necessary entries in the file / etc / fstab so that when we start Ubuntu mount the partitions.

The installer detects both partitions NTFS as VFAT from Microsoft. It also mounts them with the appropriate parameters so that we can write to them and have no problems when it comes to seeing file names with non-ASCII characters such as ñ and accented vowels.

However, sometimes, it can fail. It is in those moments of despair that this mini-tutorial can help. =)

Table of Contents

Mount a windows partition (NTFS) at boot

It is possible that if you have installed Windows after Ubuntu it will not recognize the NTFS partition or mount it at startup or that you do not have permissions to access it.

It is assumed that we are in the following situation:
  • / dev / hda1 is the location of the windows partition
  • Local folder where to mount it: / media / windows
  • The users who will use the partition belong to the users group

We create the folder:

$ sudo mkdir / media / windows

We edit the partition table:

$ sudo gedit / etc / fstab

Add or verify the following line in the file:

/ dev / hda1 / media / windows ntfs auto, ro, exec, users, dmask = 000, fmask = 111, nls = utf8 0 0

Save and exit.

Now we will tell the system to mount everything indicated in / etc / fstab:

sudo mount -a

If your / media / windows partition was already mounted previously mount -a it won't work properly if you haven't unmounted the partition before using sudo umount / media / windows

Ready, we can now enjoy our partition in / media / windows and it will self-mount whenever the system starts.

These steps will mount the NTFS partition in mode read only if you want to enable write support in NTFS read Write data to NTFS partitions.

Mount a Windows partition (FAT) at boot

If the Windows partition is a FAT32 partition and we want to allow its reading / writing, we will do the following:

It is assumed that we are in the following situation:
  • / dev / hda1 is the location of the windows partition
  • Local folder where to mount it: / media / windows
  • The users who will use the partition belong to the users group

We create the folder:

$ sudo mkdir / media / windows

We edit the partition table:

$ sudo gedit / etc / fstab

Add or verify the following line in the file:

/ dev / hda1 / media / windows vfat gid = 100, umask = 0007, fmask = 0117, utf8 0 0

Save and exit.

Now we will tell the system to mount everything indicated in / etc / fstab:

sudo mount -a

If your / media / windows partition was already mounted previously mount -a it won't work properly if you haven't unmounted the partition before using sudo umount / media / windows

Seen in | Ubuntu Guide


Sours: https://blog.desdelinux.net/en/montar-una-particion-ntfs-o-fat32-al-arrancar-ubuntu/

You will also be interested:

How to format a usb drive with FAT32 file system on Linux

Written by Guillermo Garron
Date: 2011-03-11 10:36:30 00:00


Introduction

For all Linux users, work with usb drives, is really easy, and share data with Windows users through it, is also easy.

At least before you need to format the usb drive for any reason, if you format it using Linux ext3 or any other Linux mode, you will not be able (at least not easily) to share data with Windows users. What you need is to format the usb drive using FAT32 file system.

Install dosfstools package

The package you need to install in your Linux PC to be able to format disk using FAT32 file system is:

Install dosfstools in Debian / Ubuntu

Install dosfstools in Arch Linux

Install dosfstools in Slackware

Format usb drive with FAT32

Now that you have the right tools installed, it is time to use it, so to format a usb drive using FAT32 first insert your usb drive in the usb slot of your computer, and check with

You will see something like this:

As you can see is where my usb thumb drive was connected.

Now lets format it with:

WARNING: Be really careful before formating a disk, you will not be able to recover your data, double check that you are applying the command to the right device before you hit ENTER

Note: You are supposed to have a partition created on the disk, before you format it.


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Sours: https://www.garron.me/en/go2linux/format-usb-drive-fat32-file-system-ubuntu-linux.html


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