Collier surname origin

Collier surname origin DEFAULT

Collier Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Surname Name Meaning, Origin, and Etymology
This last name is an occupational name meaning “the collier”, a person who was a charcoal burner (or seller or gatherer of coal) rock abundant and carbon  used for smelting fuel to produce metals (metallurgy) and glass in medieval times and in the Middle Ages. The name derives from the Middle English word cole  or Old English word col, meaning charcoal and the suffix ier, a designator of trades in Old English and Old French, deriving from the Latin arius or ary. The name also may have referred to someone who came from Couillet, a location in Flanders, Belgium. A man named Lord Robert Cuilly or Quilly  in the Battle Abbey Roll, which was a list of the companions of William the Conqueror who accompanied him in the Norman Invasion of England from 1066 AD.  A one Hugo de Cuilly also accompanied William (I think).

A second possible origin theory, of which not much is known, is that it comes from a French word meaning necklace.

Spelling Variations

medieval charcoal burners
medieval charcoal burners

Common spelling variants or names with similar etymologies include Colyer, Colliar, Collear, Colleer, Collyear, Colier, Collyer, Cullyer Culley, Coliere, Colyear, Coallier, Coullier, Colloeir, and Coollier. It medieval documents, the name is spelled Le Coliere and Carbonarius. Names based on this occupation also include Bloomer and Ashburner.

Popularity & Geographic Distribution
The last name Collier ranks 558th in popularity in terms in the United Status as of the 2000 Census.  The name ranks particularly high in the following six states: Georgia, Ohio, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Missouri. The surname is even more common in England, where it ranks 480th.  It ranks highest in the following counties:  Lancashire, Wiltshire, and Derbyshire. The name is common throughout the English speaking world:  Scotland (991st), Wales (334th), Ireland (978th), Canada (1,404th), New Zealand (455th), Australia (714th), and South Africa (2,293rd).  In Wales, data suggests it’s most common in county Monmouthshire. In Scotland, it ranks highest in Kinrossshire. In Ireland, the name is most frequent in Queen’s County. The name is common in Furness and along the Duddon

Early Bearers of the Surname
The earliest known bearer of this surname was Ranulf Colier who was documented in writing related to Danelaw (a section of England in which the laws of Denmark and the Danes had sway and influence) in 1150 AD. A one Bernard le Coliere was listed in the Somersetshire Pipe Rolls of 1172 AD.  The Hundred Rolls of 1273 AD, a census of Wales and England, known in Latin as Rotuli Hundredorum lists three bearers of this surname: Henry le Colyer in county Buckinghamshire, Robert le Coliere in county Bedfordshire, and Thomas le Colier in county Huntingdonshire. The Poll Tax of Yorkshire in 1379 AD lists two bearers of this last name: Adam Colier and Benedictus Colier. A one John le Collier is documented in the Calendarium Rotulorum Patentium in Turri Londinensi. Early marriages involving this last name was Zachary Collyer to Alice Hawkyns in London in 1570, AND John Collyer to Aswdrey Parteridg at St. Dunstan in 1561.

Collier in Scotland
George Fraser Black’s 1946 book The Surnames of Scotland states the following regarding this surname: “John Colzear was piper in Dunfermline in 1582, and another John Coilzear was retoured heir of John Coilzear de Lochgellie his father in 1606. Major David Coolyear referred to in 1667 is doubtless the Major David Robertson alias Collyar in the parish of Tillicoultrie mentioned in 1671. This major may be the person referred to by Macfarlane: “A Robertson a Branch from the family of Strowan Changed his name from Robertson to Collier having got out of Scotland to Holland for a Slaughter in a Collier Ship from Culross to Holland. Settled there and called himself Collier he came to be a Collonell in the Service of the States”.

Hill House
Hill House

History, Genealogy, and Ancestry
A one Robert Collyer or Collier was born in Darlaston, Staffordshire, England in 1420 AD. His son was Sir Robert Coli’re (or Coie Re) was born in Stone, England in 1453. He married Isabella Doddington and had the following issue with her: James, Margery, George, Joyce, Robert, Thurston, George, and Robert. Thurston Collier was born in Darlaston in 1542. He married Elizabeth Ironmonger and had issue with her: Robert, Anne, Anne, and James. Robert Collyer was born in Staffordshire around 1556 and he had issue: Mary, Charles, John, and Sir Isaac William. His son Charles Collier was born in London in 1580 AD. He had issue: Mary, Sir Isaac William, and John. His son William. William Collier was born in Hertfordshire in 1620. He was a weaver by trade and a Lieutenant Colonel in New Kent County and he had issue with his wife Sarah Culliford: William, John, Charles, and Sarah. He went to the United States. Charles Collier or Colyer was born in 1660 in Middlesex, England. He had issue Charles, John, Thomas, Robert, William, Virginia, Mary (Gaines) and Sara (Tunstall). His son Captain John Colyer of Collier was born in Virginia in 1684. He owned the Porto Bello plantation and Queen Ann granted him lands in King and Queen County “for diverse good causes and considerations”. He married several times and had the following issue: John, Elizabeth, Thomas, Francis, Henry Isham, Cornelius, William, Meredith, James, Eppes, and Frances. His son Captain John Collier was born in Virginia in 1707. He married Sisley Hall and Elizabeth Meredith and had the following issue: Alexander, Sally B. (Nix), Moses, Shadrack, John, Thomas, Joseph W., William, Mary (Googe), Charles, and James G. Collier. His son Captain Thomas Collier was born in 1739 in Virginia and he married Mary Frances Dabney. He was a soldier in Braddock’s campaign in the American Revolution. He had the following issue: Benjamin, Frances, John, Charles, Elizabeth Ingram, Anne, Dabney, and Martha. His son Benjamin was born in 1760 and he married Sarah Gaines Hutcheson. They had the following children: Benjamin and Elizabeth Bacon. His son Benjamin Columbus Collier Sr. was born in Charlotte, VA in 1774. He married Margaret Polly Lane and Mary Granberry and he had the following issue: Mary (Freeman), Jesse, James Gautney, Joseph, Benjamin, Thomas John, Margarete (Hooks), William Durron, Jefferson, Mary Frances Ann Jordan, Rebecca Ivey Jordan, Henry Mitchell Collier, William Granberry Collier, and Richard Collier. His son James Gautney Collier was born in Georgia in 1812. He had the following issue: Lucy Blanche, Charles Bruce, Margaret Jane, James Dallas, Liza Jane, Sarah Elizabeth, Madison Lane, Eldonia, Sophronia Ann, Johnnie, George Wynne, Emily Josephine, and Eldonia Lucretia Sumrall. Charles Bruce Collier was born in 1837 was born in Blakely, Georgia who married Catherine Anna McNeil and Charlotte A. Mushaway. He had the following issue: William Reid, Anna Harris, Charles McNeill, Perry Newton, Ann, and Elizabeth Willis.

The famous genealogist Bernard Burke’s book “The Landed Gentry” discusses two branches of this family: 1) Collyer of Hackford and 2) Collyer of Hill House.

The first begins with a mention of John Monsey Collyer, Esq. of Hackford Hall, Norfolk and Lincoln’s Inn who was a Barrister-at-Law who was born in 1840. In 1869, he married Helen Jane, daughter of George Falconar and had five children with her: John Johnston, George Falconer, Roger Messenger Monsey, William Bedingfeld, and Hugh Nathaniel. Burke traces the lineage back to a family of Hainult (a province in Walloon, Belgium). A branch of the family became established in Cripplegate in London, during the era of Queen Elizabeth, and they were refugees from Picardy, a region in northern France. A one Nathaniel Cholider, of London, died in 1669 and had a son named Saniel Cholier or Collyer. In 1686, Daniel became a freeman of that city and he married a woman named Abigail with whom he had several issue: Daniel, James, Daniel, William (of Cripplegate who has a son named Charles), Nathaniel, and Peter, as well as several daughters. His third son, Daniel Collyer, was a merchant of London, and was elected Sheriff of said city in 1749, as well as a Director of the Royal African Society. In 1745, he married Ann, daughter of Thomas Leeds, and had two sons with her: Daniel and Reverend Charles (married Sarah Pratt). His son Reverend Daniel Collyer, of Wroxham Hall and Neeton Lodge, married, in 1774, Catherine, daughter and co-heiress of John Bedingfeld, and had the following issue with her: Daniel, John, and William (Lieutenant-Colonel, married Harriet), George (Captain who died at the attack of St. Sebastian in 1813), and Caterhine. His second son, the Venerable John Bedingfield Collyer of Hackcord Hall was born in 1777. He was Archdeacon of Norwich, as well as Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant. In 1800, he married Catherine, daughter of William Alexander of London), and had the following issue with her: John, Robert, George, Catherine, Mary, Charlotte Ann (married Joseph Hemmington Harris), Elizabeth, and 1833. He died in 1856. His eldest son John Collyer was born in 1801 and was Justice of the Peace as well as Judge of the County Courts. In 1837, he married Georgina Frances Amy, daughter of Sir William Johnston, Baronet, and had  five children with her: John Monsey (mentioned at the beginning of this paragraph), William Robert (of the Inner Temple), D’Arcy Bedingfeld, Reverend Daniel (Vicar of Castleacre, married Helen Augusta Preston), and Georginia Maria. The Collyer Family Crest or Collier Coat of Arms is blazoned as follows in heraldry: Argent, a chevron, between three unicorns’ heads, couped, gules.

The second branch begins with a mention of George Chancellor Collyer, Esquire of Hill House in county Norfolk who was born in 1814 and succeeded his father in 1866. He was a Colonel of the Royal Engineers. His first wife was Mary Forbes, daughter of Alexander Chancellor of Shield Hill, with whom he had a daughter named Mary Catherine Bedingfeld, who married Lieutenant Colonel J.H.M. Shaw-Stewart. His second wife was Rose Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph Dillon of Finchley. This George was the son and heir of Daniel Collyer of Necton Lodge, discussed in the above paragraph.

Jena Cuthbert Collier
Jena Cuthbert Collier

Early American and New World Settlers
Daniel Collier, age 30, came to Virginia aboard the Paule of London in July 1635.
Ambross Collyer to Boston in March 1678 aboard the Society.
Tobias Collyer, who owned two slaves, lived in Christ Church in the Barbados in 1680.

The book Genealogical Guide to the Early Settlers, mentions 7 people bearing this surname, not already mentioned above.
1) Joseph Collier of Salisbury, who had a daughter named Mary in 1662. He moved to Hartford, Connecticut and died there. He also had children Joseph, Mary (Phelps), Sara, Elizabeth, Abel, John, Abigail, Susanna, and Ann.
3) Thomas Collier of Hingham who came in 1635 and became a freeman in 1646. He died in 1647 and had a wife and daughter both named Susanna, as well as two sons: Moses and Thomas
4) William Collier of Duxbury, Massachusetts who was a merchant from London who arrived in 1633, who acted as one of the adventurers, and had so generous a spirit, as not to be content with making profit by the enterprise of pilgrims, unless he shared their hardships”. He had issue named Sarah (married Love Brewster), Rebecca (married Jon Cole), Mary (married Thomas Prence), and Elizabeth (married Samuel Freeman). He was one of the first purchasers of Dartmouth.

Other early bearers of this last name in Colonial American were Henry Collier (Virginia 1648), William Collier (Maryland 1649), and Sara Collier (Virginia 1704).

Some of the earliest settlers in Canada bearing this name were Christopher, John, and Ralph Collier, who arrived in Nova Scotia around 1749. One of the earliest settlers in Canada with this name was John Collier, a blacksmith, who came in the late 1820s or early 1830s to Tasmania (then called Van Diemen’s Land). Some of the earliest bearers in New Zealand were George, James, and Robert, who settled in Wellington in 1840. The next year, George and Elizabeth Collier came aboard the Lady Nugent.

Early Americans Bearing the Collier Family Crest
Charles Bolton’s American Armory, published in 1927, contains one entry for the surname Collier: Arg on a chev az bet 3 demi- unicorns courant [gu] as many acorn slips [or] Crest: a demi-negro ppr with pearls in ears arg holding in the dexter hand an acorn branch fructed [or]. Greeting card of Jena Cuthbert Collier, Barnesville, Ga.

Henry Watkins Collier
Henry Watkins Collier

Mottoes
We have identified five Collier/Collyer family mottoes: 1) Persevere, 2) Nemo sine cruce beatus, meaning “No one is happy but by the cross”, 3) St. Sebastian, 4) Auxilium meum a Domini, meaning “My help is from the Lord”, and 5) Avance, meaning “Advance”.

Grantees
We have 11 coats of arms for the Collier surname depicted here. The first 3 blazons are from The Armorial General by the famous genealogist/heraldist Johannes Baptisa Rietstap. The remainder are from Bernard Burke’s book The General Armory of England, Ireland, and Scotland, which was published in 1848. The bottom of this page contains the blazons, and in many instances contains some historical, geographical, and genealogical about where coat of arms was found and who bore it. People with this last name that bore a Collier Coat of Arms include:
1) Francis Collier if Darlaston, Stafford, descendant from Robert, who came out of France into England, confirmed October 10th 1629 by Segar
2) Richard Collyer, of Puddletrent-hyhe, Dorset, son John and grandson of Henry, confirmed October 20th 1586 by W. Dethick.
3) Robert Collyer, of Darlaston, Stafford, gift 1559 (by Harvey).

Notables
There are hundreds of notable people with the Collier surname. This page will mention a handful. Famous people with this last name include: 1) Arthur Collier (1680-1732) who was an English Anglican priest and a philosopher from Wiltshire, 2) Barron Gift Collier (1873-1939) who was an American advertising entrepreneur from Memphis, Tennessee who became a large lawn owner and developer in Florida, 3) Constance Collier (1878-1955) who was an English stage actress from Berkshire, 4) Elisha Haydon Collier (1788-1856) who invented the flintlock revolver in 1814,  5) Sir George Ralph Collier (1774-1824) who was an officer in the British Royal Navy who served in the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812 and became a Baronet, 6) Evert Collier (1632-1708) who was a Dutch Golden Age painter from Breda, Noord-Brabant, 7) Henry Watkins Collier (1801-1855) who was the 14th Governor of Alabama, 8) John Maler Collier (1850-1934) who was an English artist who married a daughter of Thomas Henry Huxley, 9) Mary Collier (168—1762) who was an English poet from Hampshire, 10) Robert Porrett Collier (1817-1886) who was an English lawyer, judge, and politician from Plymouth who became the 1st Baron Monkswell, and 11) Philip Collier (1873-1948) who was an Australian politician who became the Premier of Western Australia in 1924.

Sours: https://coadb.com/surnames/collier-arms.html

Collier Family History | Find Genealogy Records & Family Crest

Collier Crest and Family Coat of Arms

Collier Genealogy & History

Collier genealogy is British and is first found in Lancashire. The root of the word is the Old English col meaning coal. It was originally an occupational surname referring to someone who was a miner or seller of coal. Alternate spellings in the written records include Colyar, Colier, and Colyear. There are Colliers among the early European settlers of the United States, including Thomas Collier, who settled in Massachusetts in 1635 as well as Henry Collier, who came to Virginia in 1648. Collier family history includes English philosopher Arthur Collier and former governor of Alabama Henry W. Collier.


Collier Birth Records

NameBirth DateDeath DateLocation
A Sylvia Collier-- --, 1928October 19,2004ME
B Ilene Collier-- --, 1916September 17,1996MI
C Wayne Collier-- --, 1917November 8,2000NC
D Jack Collier-- --, 1962April 29,1991TX

Collier Death Records

NameBirth DateDeath DateLocation
Earl Collier-- --, 1925September 2,1997Waverly,TN
Falby Collier-- --, 1899September ,1982Nashville,TN
G Claire Collier-- --, 1926July ,1993Hudson,MA
H Grady Collier-- --, 1926January 3,2001Metairie,LA

Collier Marriage Records

NameSpouseMarriage DateLocation
Douglas CollierFrances WoodallNovember 13,1948Wake, NC
Floyd CollierWennona BundyNovember 5,1965Wake, NC
Glenn CollierDawn WilliamsDecember 30,2000Wake, NC
Melvin CollierVirginia HammOctober 17,1936Wake, NC

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Collier Surname

4,734th

Most Common

surname in the World

Approximately 119,317 people bear this surname

Most prevalent in:

United States

Highest density in:

Sierra Leone

Collier Surname Definition:

This surname is derived from an occupation. 'the collier,' i.e. a charcoal burner. '1598, Jan. 8. Buried, a daughter of a collier at Blawith' (Registers, Ulverston). An Act of Parliament (Elizabeth) is entitled, 'An Act that timber shall not be felled to make coals for the burning of iron.

Read More About This Surname

The alternate forms: Collièr (1) are calculated separately.

Collier (1,020) may also be a first name.

Collier Surname Meaning

From Where Does The Surname Originate? meaning and history

This surname is derived from an occupation. 'the collier,' i.e. a charcoal burner. '1598, Jan. 8. Buried, a daughter of a collier at Blawith' (Registers, Ulverston). An Act of Parliament (Elizabeth) is entitled, 'An Act that timber shall not be felled to make coals for the burning of iron.' The Psalmist speaks of 'coals of juniper.' Collier is the term still used throughout Furness and along the Duddon for a charcoal burner. The fuel was used in the bloom-smithies. See Ashburner and Bloomer.

Adam Colier, 1379: Poll Tax of Yorkshire.

Benedictus Colier, 1379: ibid.

John le Collier. Calendarium Rotulorum Patentium in Turri Londinensi.

Henry le Colyer, Buckinghamshire, 1273. Hundred Rolls.

Robert le Cohere, Bedfordshire, ibid.

Thomas le Colier, Huntingdonshire, ibid.

1570. Zachary Collyer and Alice Hawkyns: Marriage Lic. (London).

A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames (1896) by Charles Wareing Endell Bardsley


The word collier originally meant a charcoal-burner and not, as now, a coal-miner. John Colzear was piper in Dunfermline in 1582 (Dunfermline), and another John Coilzear was retoured heir of John Coilzear de Lochgellie his father in 1606 (Retours, Fife, 163). Major David Coolyear referred to in 1667 (Bruces of Airth, p. xxvi) is doubtless the Major David Robertson alias Collyar in the parish of Tillicoultrie mentioned in 1671 (Dunblane). This major may be the person referred to by Macfarlane: "A Robertson a Branch from the family of Strowan Changed his name from Robertson to Collier having got out of Scotland to Holland for a Slaughter in a Collier Ship from Culross to Holland. Settled there and called himself Collier he came to be a Collonell in the Service of the States" (Macfarlane, II, p. 314—315). William Coalyear in Craigiewall, 1674 (Edin. App.). Colyeer 1679, Colzear 1563.

The Surnames of Scotland (1946) by George Fraser Black (1866-1948)


This well known English name is included here because it has been in Ireland at least since 1305, when Thomas Colyere was one of a guard appointed by the seneschal of Trim, Co. Meath. In that barony there is a place called Collierstown; in another part of Meath there is another Collierstown and a Colliersland. The latter is mentioned in a Fiant of 1543.The name is found intermittently up to the late sixteenth century when the Elizabethan Captain Collier was prominent. In the next century, though historically it is connected with Co. Derry, we find it listed by Petty as a principal Irish (sic) name in the barony of Dunleek, Co. Meath. Coluer is similarly returned for the barony of Shelbourne, Co. Wexford but I am assuming that this, i.e. Coluer, is a variant of Colfer. In this connexion it should be noted that Co.

Wexford and the adjacent counties of Carlow and Kilkenny are its present main location. In the middle of the last century it was also quite numerous in Queen's County (Leix).

The present Bishop of Ossory is Dr. Collier; Father Anthony Collier, who was shot by Communists in Korea in 1950, was from Co. Louth. The derivation of the name is simple: it means a charcoal burner.

In the form Colyear it is counted as a branch of the Scottish clan Robertson.

Supplement to Irish Families (1964) by Edward MacLysaght


(English) orig. Charcoal Burner or Seller; later also Coal-Seller [Middle English colter— Middle English col, Old English col, coal, charcoal]

Surnames of the United Kingdom (1912) by Henry Harrison


This English name, on record in Ireland since 1305, was well enough established in Co. Meath to be reckoned in Petty’s “census” of 1659 as a principal Irish name there. It is now mainly found in Cos. Carlow, Kilkenny and Wexford. SIF 37

A Guide to Irish Names (1964) by Edward MacLysaght


(English) One who worked, or dealt, in coal, a coal miner; one who made wood charcoal; one who worked in, or came from, the village of Caulieres in France.

Dictionary of American Family Names (1956) by Elsdon Coles Smith


A maker of charcoal, formerly a much more important and common occupation than now. In medieval documents it is written Le Coliere, Carbonarius, &c.

Patronymica Britannica (1860) by Mark Antony Lower


This name was assumed by an ancestor of the family, because when hotly pursued by his enemies he hid himself in a coal pit.

The Origin and Signification of Scottish Surnames (1862) by Clifford Stanley Sims (1839-1896)


A name of occupation, a dealer or workman in coals.

An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names (1857) by William Arthur


Collier: Although originally a charcoal-burner, the name came to be used for the dealer in the town in charcoal and in sea-coal.

Family Names And Their Story (1913) by Sabine Baring-Gould

User-submitted Reference

Means 'collier,' another name for a coal miner.

- athorny

DNA test information

Collier Last Name Facts

Where Does The Last Name Collier Come From? nationality or country of origin

The surname Collier (Arabic: كوللير) occurs in The United States more than any other country/territory. It may also be found as: Collièr. For other potential spellings of this surname click here.

How Common Is The Last Name Collier? popularity and diffusion

This surname is the 4,734th most commonly used last name at a global level It is held by approximately 1 in 61,077 people. The surname occurs predominantly in The Americas, where 63 percent of Collier are found; 63 percent are found in North America and 63 percent are found in Anglo-North America. Collier is also the 251,402nd most commonly held first name globally, held by 1,020 people.

The surname Collier is most commonly held in The United States, where it is held by 75,945 people, or 1 in 4,773. In The United States Collier is most common in: Texas, where 11 percent reside, Georgia, where 8 percent reside and California, where 7 percent reside. Beside The United States it is found in 100 countries. It is also common in England, where 14 percent reside and Sierra Leone, where 6 percent reside.

Collier Family Population Trend historical fluctuation

The prevalency of Collier has changed over time. In The United States the share of the population with the surname rose 717 percent between 1880 and 2014; in England it rose 178 percent between 1881 and 2014; in Wales it rose 373 percent between 1881 and 2014; in Ireland it rose 270 percent between 1901 and 2014 and in Scotland it rose 171 percent between 1881 and 2014.

Collier Last Name Statistics demography

The religious adherence of those bearing the Collier surname is predominantly Catholic (73%) in Ireland.

In The United States those holding the Collier surname are 11.3% more likely to be registered with the Republican Party than the national average, with 58.07% being registered with the party.

The amount Collier earn in different countries varies greatly. In Norway they earn 1203.29% more than the national average, earning 4,510,420 kr per year; in Peru they earn 1776.92% more than the national average, earning S/. 363,841 per year; in South Africa they earn 64.37% more than the national average, earning R 390,612 per year; in United States they earn 5.5% less than the national average, earning $40,774 USD per year and in Canada they earn 4.11% more than the national average, earning $51,723 CAD per year.

Phonetically Similar Names

SurnameSimilarityWorldwide IncidencePrevalency
Collièr951/
Chollier93411/
Colliere93150/
Coullier9376/
Coillier9335/
Coellier937/
Colliher936/
Collyier933/
Collierr933/
Colliuer932/
Colloier932/
Ciollier931/
Coëllier931/
Colllier931/
Colliert931/
Coollier931/
Ccollier931/
Tcollier931/
Colliear930/
Collie929,691/
Coller923,346/
Colier92474/
Collir9253/
Cotillier8836/
Cholliere8812/
Couëllier881/
Cocillier881/
Coulliere881/
Cotellier880/
Collyer866,986/
Callier862,556/
Coulier861,278/
Collaer86247/
Colliez86223/
Cullier86202/
Collere86154/
Collies8699/
Collert8686/
Collair8672/
Collerd8660/
Coilier8660/
Cholier8658/
Czoller8649/
Coullie8647/
Coelier8629/
Cotlier8626/
Colleur8625/
Colliee8624/
Colleer8623/
Colleir8622/
Coillie8621/
Colliet8617/
Kollier8616/
Coolier867/
Collird867/
Couller865/
Collior865/
Coloier865/
Choller864/
Coliier863/
Cohller862/
Collire862/
Cooller862/
Coeller862/
Colluer862/
Collear861/
Coyller861/
Colletr861/
Colloer861/
Colyier861/
Collieh861/
Coliher860/
Collger860/
Coollie860/
Colierr860/
Coylier860/
Cohlier860/
Coler832,646/
Colie83415/
Colir838/
Coutellier821,308/
Collierová821/
Coutillier820/
Challier802,120/
Cuillier80520/
Caullier80166/
Choliere80113/
Collaire8077/
Choulier8074/
Culliere8035/
Colleije8022/
Calliere8011/
Coislier809/
Culliher804/
Collière804/
Couëlier801/
Colleyer801/
Tcallier801/
Collertt801/
Collayer801/
Colliére801/
Colllyer801/
Collettr801/
Colleard801/
Coilliet801/
Coullert801/
Colloyer800/
Calliert800/
Collaird800/
Kolliher800/
Calliher800/
Couttellier781/
Kollie77103,501/
Koller7755,749/
Zoller7712,365/
Colyer776,421/
Culler774,639/
Caller771,843/
Cooler771,049/
Cotler77600/
Cosler77370/
Cohler77290/
Colere77169/
Coulie77107/
Coleur77104/
Choler7791/
Collée7791/
Coolie7783/
Calier7777/
Culier7760/
Colher7759/
Coyler7756/
Coeler7745/
Colire7739/
Kolier7737/
Coliir7723/
Colger7722/
Callie7721/
Coiler7719/
Colert778/
Couler778/
Coylie775/
Coluer775/
Colirt775/
Collge774/
Zolier774/
Coliet774/
Kollir774/
Célier773/
Callir773/
Colejr773/
Qollie772/
Coilie772/
Colesr772/
Collié772/
Coliea771/
Coliez771/
Colies771/
Colije771/
Colihe771/
Colaer771/
Colyie771/
Collye771/
Coleer770/
Coloer770/
Colyir770/
Qoller770/
Colair770/
Cullir770/
Colear770/
Catellier751,162/
Couteller75203/
Cuilliere75144/
Chaullier7582/
Collerová7537/
Calluiere757/
Collerova752/
Coutiller751/
Couseller751/
Couceller751/
Catillier751/
Tchollire751/
Casillier751/
Coullaird751/
Cotillyer751/
Callies713,252/
Koeller713,245/
Caulier712,839/
Chalier711,196/
Kollert71672/
Callear71649/
Cuiller71364/
Cullere71306/
Kollere71253/
Colayir71195/
Calliet71153/
Chouler71124/
Colaire71120/
Cottler71118/
Tsoller71112/
Cousler7199/
Cauller7194/
Couloir7193/
Cotleur7189/
Couleur7185/
Callert7176/
Coutler7155/
Cotlear7155/
Cholger7154/
Challer7148/
Kallier7143/
Callire7140/
Callere7135/
Callair7129/
Kholler7129/
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Couliez7122/
Cullyer7121/
Kotlier7119/
Kohller7119/
Calliea7118/
Coehler7117/
Kollaer7115/
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Cautellier7114/
Czaller7113/
Koiller7112/
Koliear7111/
Kollioe7110/
Callyer718/
Couttiller717/
Chuller717/
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Caliere716/
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Kolllie716/
Callerd716/
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Collier Name Transliterations

TransliterationICU LatinPercentage of Incidence
Collier in the Arabic language
كولليرkwllyr-
كوليارkwlyar-

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Collier Reference & Research

Collier DNA Website - A web page dedicated to the genetic research of those who bear the surname and its variants.

Collier FamilyTree DNA Project - A description of a group researching the paternal lines of men who bear the surname with the help of DNA analysis.

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  • Surnames are taken as the first part of an person's inherited family name, caste, clan name or in some cases patronymic
  • Descriptions may contain details on the name's etymology, origin, ethnicity and history. They are largely reproduced from 3rd party sources; diligence is advised on accepting their validity - more information
  • Name distribution statistics are generated from a global database of over 4 billion people - more information
  • Heatmap: Dark red means there is a higher occurrence of the name, transitioning to light yellow signifies a progressively lower occurrence. Clicking on selected countries will show mapping at a regional level
  • Rank: Name are ranked by incidence using the ordinal ranking method; the name that occurs the most is assigned a rank of 1; name that occur less frequently receive an incremented rank; if two or more name occur the same number of times they are assigned the same rank and successive rank is incremented by the total preceeding names
  • Ethnic group cannot necessarily be determined by geographic occurrence
  • Similar: Names listed in the "Similar" section are phonetically similar and may not have any relation to Collier
  • To find out more about this surname's family history, lookup records on Family​Search, My​Heritage, FindMyPast and Ancestry. Further information may be obtained by DNA analysis
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62,590 Collier members around the world

Collier Family History

This long-established name is of early medieval English origin, and is an occupational surname for a burner of charcoal, or a gatherer or seller of coal. The name derives from the Middle English "cole", (char)coal, from the Olde English pre 7th Century "col", with the agent suffix "(i)er", denoting "one who does or works with". Job-descriptive surnames were originally acquired with reference to the actual occupation of the namebearer, and gradually became hereditary. Early examples of the surname include: Bernard le Coliere, in the Somersetshire Pipe Rolls of 1172; Henry le Colyer, in the Buckinghamshire Hundred Rolls of 1275' and John le Collier, in the London Patent Rolls of circa 1280.

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Origin collier surname

Collier (surname)

Collier is an English surname.[1]

People with this name include:

  • Ada Langworthy Collier (1843–1919), pen name, "Anna L. Cunningham", American writer
  • Anne Collier (born 1970), American visual artist
  • Arthur Collier (1680–1732), English philosopher
  • Austin Collier (1914–1991), English professional footballer
  • Barron Collier (1873–1939), American advertising entrepreneur
  • Barry Collier (basketball), athletic director, Butler University
  • Barry Collier (politician), New South Wales politician
  • Basil Collier, military historian
  • Bernard Collier (1802–1890), English-born Mauritius Roman Catholic prelate
  • Bill Collier (1921–2015), Australian rugby league footballer
  • Bobby Collier (1929–2000), American football player
  • Calvin J. Collier (born 1942), FTC chair
  • Celester Collier, American basketball coach
  • Charles Collier (1848–1900), American banker and lawyer
  • Christopher Collier (cricketer) (1888–1916), English cricketer
  • Christopher Collier (historian) (b. 1930), American historian and author
  • Constance Collier (1878–1955), British-born American film actress
  • David Collier (sports administrator) (b. 1956), CEO, England and Wales Cricket Board
  • David Collier (cartoonist) (b. 1963), Canadian alternative cartoonist
  • David Collier (political scientist), qualitative methodology and Latin American politics
  • David Charles Collier "D. C." Collier, San Diego real estate developer
  • Don Collier (1928–2021), American actor
  • Edward Collier (pirate), 17th century
  • Elisha Collier, inventor of the flintlock revolver
  • Elliot Collier, (soccer) footballer for Chicago Fire and New Zealand
  • Evert Collier (c. 1640–1708), Dutch painter
  • Francis Augustus Collier (1783-1849), Royal Navy rear-admiral
  • Frank Collier, former British rugby league footballer
  • George Collier (1738–1795), Royal Navy vice-admiral
  • Sir George Collier, 1st Baronet (1774–1824), Royal Navy officer
  • Gerard Collier, 5th Baron Monkswell (1947–2020), British politician
  • Giles Collier, (1622–1678), English divine
  • Harry Collier (1907–1994), Australian rules footballer in the Victorian Football League
  • Henry Herbert Collier (1859–1925), British motorcycle pioneer
  • Henry W. Collier (1801–1855), Governor of Alabama (1849–1853)
  • Ian Collier (d. 2008), British actor
  • Jacob Collier (b. 1994), British arranger-musician-singer
  • James Collier (1872–1933), American politician from Mississippi
  • James Lincoln Collier (b. 1928), journalist and writer
  • James Stansfield Collier (1870–1935), English physician and neurologist
  • Jason Collier (1977–2005), NBA basketball player
  • Jeremy Collier (1650–1726), English theatre critic
  • John Collier (Pre-Raphaelite painter) (1850–1934), artist
  • John Collier (fiction writer) (1901–1980), British author and screenplay writer
  • John Collier (sociologist) (1884-1968), American sociologist, head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs
  • John Payne Collier (1789–1883), British Shakespearean critic
  • Jonathan Collier, American television writer
  • L. J. Collier (born 1995), American football player
  • Laurence Collier (1890–1976), British ambassador to Norway (1939–1950)
  • Lois Collier (1919–1999), American film actress
  • Lou Collier (b. 1970), American baseball player
  • Marie Collier (1927–1971), Australian operatic soprano
  • Mark H. Collier, former president of Baldwin-Wallace College
  • Marsha Collier, American author and radio personality
  • Mary Collier (c.1688–1762), English poet
  • Michael Collier (disambiguation), several people
  • Napheesa Collier (born 1996), American basketball player
  • Norman Collier (1925–2013), British comedian
  • Patience Collier (1910–1987), British actress
  • Paul Collier, British author and Professor of Economics at Oxford
  • Paul Collier (activist) (1964–2010), Australian disability activist
  • Paul Collier (snooker referee) (born 1970), from Wales
  • Peter Collier (politician), Australian politician
  • Peter Collier (political author) (b. 1939), American writer
  • Peter Fenelon Collier (1849–1909), Irish publisher, father of Robert Joseph Collier
  • Philip Collier (1873–1978), former Premier of Western Australia
  • R. John Collier (b. 1938), American microbiologist and biochemist
  • Robert Collier (author) (1885–1950), American author of self-help, and New Thought metaphysical books
  • Robert Joseph Collier (1876–1918), American publisher, son of Peter Fenelon Collier
  • Robert Porrett Collier, 1st Baron Monkswell (1817–1886), English judge and politician
  • Ron Collier (1930–2003), Canadian jazz trombonist
  • Sophia Collier, founder of the American Natural Beverage Corp
  • Tim Collier (born 1954), NFL footballer
  • Thomas Collier (disambiguation), several people
  • William Collier Jr. (1902–1987), American actor
  • William Collier Sr. (1864–1944), American writer, director and actor
  • William Collier (colonist) (c. 1585–1671), English settler in Massachusetts
  • William Collier (MP), MP for Truro, 1713–15, and manager of the Drury Lane Theatre
  • William Collier (footballer) (born 1890), Scottish footballer, played for Scotland in 1922
  • William Miller Collier (1867–1956), American diplomat

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collier_(surname)
AF-298: The Origin and Meaning of Scottish Surnames - Ancestral Findings Podcast

Collier

SDB Popularity ranking: 185

This long-established name is of early medieval English origin, and is an occupational surname for a burner of charcoal, or a gatherer or seller of coal. The name derives from the Middle English "cole", (char)coal, from the Olde English pre 7th Century "col", with the agent suffix "(i)er", denoting "one who does or works with". Job-descriptive surnames were originally acquired with reference to the actual occupation of the namebearer, and gradually became hereditary. Early examples of the surname include: Bernard le Coliere, in the Somersetshire Pipe Rolls of 1172; Henry le Colyer, in the Buckinghamshire Hundred Rolls of 1275' and John le Collier, in the London Patent Rolls of circa 1280. The modern surname forms range from Collier, Colliar and Colliard, to Collyer, Colyer, Collyear and Colleer. Among the recordings of the name in London Church Registers are those of the marriages of John Collyer and Awdrey Parteridg at St. Dunstan in the East, on April 19th 1561, and of Thomas Collyer and Elizabeth Prowe on May 26th 1583, at St. Bartholomew the Less. One of the Coat of Arms granted to a family of the name is a red shield, on a silver chevron three red roses stalked and leaved green, between three silver wolves' heads erased. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Ranulf Colier, which was dated 1150, in "Documents relating to the Danelaw", Lincolnshire, during the reign of King Stephen, known as "County of Blois", 1135 - 1154. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

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Sours: https://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Collier

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