Whio radio

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LISTEN LIVE: How To Stream WHIO Radio

You can listen online at WHIO.com, on the WHIO App, or on your Smart Speaker

Streaming WHIO Radio has never been easier! Take AM 1290 and News 95.7 with you wherever you go and get Dayton’s Weather, Traffic, News, and your favorite talk shows with you wherever you go. Here are all the ways you can stream WHIO Radio on your computer, smartphone, or on your smart speakers.⤵

Computer: Listen now by clicking Listen Live at the top right of this page.


Phone: Download the WHIO App and click on LIVE.


Alexa: Have an Alexa device? Just ask Alexa to “Play WHIO” - Enable this skill

You can also listen to WHIO Radio on

Sours: https://www.whio.com/whio-radio/listen-live-how-stream-whio-radio/L2GT5JTEZBGBFNDR7RTPORCBI4/

WHIO (AM)

For the FM radio station in Piqua, Ohio, United States, see WHIO-FM.

News/talk radio station in Dayton, Ohio, United States

Radio station in Dayton, Ohio

The Cox Enterprises broadcasting tower was located outside the old studio in Kettering, Ohio before the studio building on Wilmington Pike was torn down in 2017.

WHIO (1290 AM) – branded AM 1290 and News 95.7 WHIO – is a commercialtalkradio station licensed to serve Dayton, Ohio and covering the Dayton metropolitan area. Owned by Cox Media Group,[2] the WHIO studios are located at the Cox Media Center building in Dayton, while the transmitter is located in nearby Kettering. In addition to a standard analog transmission, WHIO is simulcast full-time on WHIO-FM (95.7) and is available online.

History[edit]

WHIO was Cox Radio's first station started by company founder Ohio GovernorJames M. Cox in the Dayton Daily News building downtown, on Ludlow Street. It signed on the air on February 9, 1935.[3] To create a new radio service in Dayton, Cox had to purchase WLBW[4] in Oil City, Pennsylvania, from the Petroleum Telephone Company.[5] Cox shut down that operation and moved the radio station to Dayton.[6] The station first broadcast at a power of 1,000 watts on 1260 kHz, which had been the frequency of WLBW.[7] With the enactment of the North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement (NARBA) in 1941, WHIO moved to its current frequency at 1290 kHz. 90% of all AM stations in America were forced to change frequencies.[8]

At its founding, WHIO was an NBC Red Networkaffiliate, also taking some shows from the NBC Blue Network.[9] But in the 1940s, WHIO switched to the CBS Radio Network. Then, as network programming moved from radio to television, WHIO switched to a full servicemiddle of the road format of popular music, news and sports.[10]

In 1946, Cox Radio added an FM station, 99.1 WHIO-FM. At first, WHIO-FM simulcast the AM station. But in the 1960s, it began airing a beautiful music format. And in 1989, it became WHKO with a country music format. In 1949, Cox added a TV station, WHIO-TV on Channel 13 (later on Channel 7). Because WHIO had been an CBS affiliate, WHIO-TV also began airing CBS Television programs.

WHIO's long history in the market included Lou Emm. Emm was a popular host of variety shows, live remote broadcasts and station promotions. He started at WHIO in the early 1940s and retired in 1992. When Emm died a few years later, all Dayton radio stations paused for a moment of silence.

Phil Donahue started at WHIO as the host of the weekday talk show "Conversation Piece" in the 1960s before his move to television and competitor Channel 2 WLWD (now WDTN) in 1967. His show became nationally syndicated beginning in 1970. During this era, Winston Hoehner was news director at WHIO for 25 years and was a member of the Ohio Associated Press Broadcast Journalism Hall of Fame. He died in 1990.

WHIO was the originating station of a regional news network in the 1960s and '70s which was aired late afternoons on stations in surrounding communities throughout the Miami Valley as "The DP&L News Network" (named for its sponsor, The Dayton Power and Light Company). A similar network aired in the 1990s during this same time frame as "The Newscenter 7 Radio Network."

On October 30, 2006, Cox Radio pulled the plug on the all-1980 hits format on WDPT "95.7 The Point." The station switched to a simulcast of WHIO's News/Talk format. 95.7 WHIO-FM has an effective radiated power of 50,000 watts and covers much of south central Ohio, also reaching into Eastern Indiana. The simulcast gives listeners the choice of hearing WHIO on either FM or AM.

Programming[edit]

WHIO-FM personality Larry Hansgen hosts the morning-drive program, Miami Valley's Morning News. Brian Kilmeade's late-morning program, produced by Fox News Talk and distributed by Westwood One, airs in late mornings. The Mark Kaye Show (based at WOKV-FM[11]) and The Sean Hannity Show (via Premiere Networks) airs in middays[12] and afternoons. A local show hosted by Todd Hollst and Dana Loesch air in the evening hours, respectively. Coast to Coast AM (via Premiere) airs in the overnight hours.

WHIO-FM also serves as the radio home for University of DaytonFlyersfootball and basketball.

References[edit]

  1. ^"Call Letter Origins". Radio History on the Web.
  2. ^"WHIO Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division.
  3. ^Broadcasting Yearbook 1936 page 82
  4. ^"World Radio History"(PDF). 1929.
  5. ^Sound Waves. T.H. Wilson Company. 1906.
  6. ^"A selection from a decade of visits to tower and studio sites in the Northeast and beyond". www.fybush.com. Retrieved 2018-05-23.
  7. ^Commission, Federal Radio (1971). Annual Report of the Federal Radio Commission to the Congress of the United States. Arno Press. ISBN .
  8. ^"In 1941, Stations Confronted 'Moving Day'". Radio World. Retrieved 2018-05-23.
  9. ^"WHIO Will Open Feb. 2 Over NBC Red Network; Rate Card Is Announced"(PDF). Broadcasting. January 1, 1935. Retrieved 12 October 2014.
  10. ^Broadcasting Yearbook 1977 page C-162
  11. ^Venta, Lance (March 15, 2021). "WOKV Moves Mark Kaye Into Rush Limbaugh Timeslot". RadioInsight. Retrieved April 23, 2021.
  12. ^WHIO Radio Staff (March 30, 2021). "NEW: The Mark Kaye Show on WHIO Radio". WHIO TV 7 and WHIO Radio. Retrieved April 23, 2021.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to WHIO (AM).
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WHIO_(AM)
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WHIO-FM

News/talk radio station in Pleasant Hill–Dayton, Ohio

Radio station in Pleasant Hill, Ohio

WHIO-FM (95.7 FM) – branded AM 1290 and News 95.7 WHIO – is a commercialtalkradio station licensed to serve Pleasant Hill, Ohio, covering Dayton, Ohio and the Dayton metropolitan area. Owned by Cox Media Group, WHIO-FM acts as a full-time simulcast of WHIO. The WHIO-FM studios are located at Cox Media Center building in Dayton, while the transmitter is located in nearby Piqua. In addition to a standard analog transmission, WHIO-FM streams online.

History[edit]

On November 30, 1960, the station signed on as WPTW-FM. Its original city of license was Piqua, and it largely simulcast co-owned WPTW1570 AM.[2] WPTW-FM served as an extension of the AM station's programming, as WPTW originally operated as a daytime-only station.

By the late 1960s, WPTW played middle of the road music using a sophisticated reel-to-reel automation system, while the FM had a beautiful music format, playing 15 minute sweeps of instrumental cover versions of popular songs, at first with no vocals. The exception was the "Dell-O Morning Show" hosted by Dell Olmay, and heard on both stations. WPTW-FM's station identification remained until 1974 as: "This is WPTW...FM Stereo...transmitting from Piqua, Ohio." It began using both Piqua and Troy in its legal I.D. in 1975.

After Federal Communications Commission rules changed regarding daytimer AM stations operating on Mexican "clear channel frequencies", 1570 WPTW was finally given approval by the FCC in 1986 to broadcast around the clock. That led WPTW-FM to end all simulcasting. WPTW-FM could carry a separate format and image, including a change in its call sign.

The original Kool 95 logo

After the original WHIO-FM 99.1 flipped to country music from easy listening in 1989, WPTW-FM management wanted to quickly fill the hole. The station continued its own easy format, but changed its call letters to WCLR with the moniker "Clear 95." Later that year, in an effort to attract younger listeners, WCLR began adding more vocals to its easy format. WCLR made a full switch to Soft Adult Contemporary a short time later, still under the "Clear 95" name with the "Lite and Easy Favorites" slogan.

In early 1993, WCLR switched to an oldies format playing the hits of the 1950s through the early 1970s as "Kool 95." Later that year, it purchased WDJK in nearby Xenia, flipping the call letters to WZLR and simulcasting the oldies format on both 95.3 and 95.7. In mid-1997 after the stations were purchased by Cox Media Group, the moniker was changed to "Oldies 95", keeping the same format.

Former WDPT 95.7 The Point logo

In 2000, the station switched from oldies to classic hits, covering the top songs from the late 1970s through the 1980s. It changed its call letters to WDPT and switched its moniker to "The Point." It only continued the simulcast with 95.3 for a short time, before the Xenia station flipped to classic rock as "The Eagle." 95.7 The Point, and its mostly 1980s format, was consulted by Randy Kabrich, who had programmed WRBQ/Tampa in the mid-to-late 1980s.

In October 2006, after playing "Don't You (Forget About Me)" by Simple Minds, WDPT's music format ended. The station began a simulcast of WHIO, using the call sign WHIO-FM.

In July 2011, the station changed its "community of license" from Piqua, Ohio, to Pleasant Hill, Ohio, even though the transmitter did not move. This change was reportedly necessitated by FCC requirements that the station's main studio be located within 25 miles of its community of license. With the move of Cox Media Group facilities to the South Main Street location, Piqua no longer met that requirement, but Pleasant Hill does.[3] That rule was eliminated by the FCC in October 2017.[4]

Programming[edit]

WHIO-FM personality Larry Hansgen hosts the morning-drive program, Miami Valley's Morning News. Brian Kilmeade's late-morning program, produced by Fox News Talk and distributed by Westwood One, airs in late mornings. The Mark Kaye Show (based at WOKV-FM[5]) and The Sean Hannity Show (via Premiere Networks) airs in middays[6] and afternoons. Bill O'Reilly's daily radio commentary, a local show hosted by Todd Hollst and Dana Loesch air in the evening hours, respectively. Coast to Coast AM (via Premiere) airs in the overnight hours.

WHIO-FM also serves as the radio home for University of DaytonFlyersfootball and basketball.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WHIO-FM
WHIO Studios Tour 3-25-1989

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