2014 gt fury

2014 gt fury DEFAULT

Dirt &#; GT Fury World Cup

Dirt

GT&#;s latest downhill bike, we think it is fair to say, has been a game changer for Gee and Rachel Atherton in ; one of the factors contributing to their many successes over the year.

GT FURY WORLD CUP

With this bike GT have been the first company to produce a DH bike with a wheelbase that breaks the 50” barrier, and we think that fact alone is a contributing factor to Gee and Rachel Atherton’s World Cup success in Even Rachel’s medium is bigger than most companies&#; larges, and when the going gets fast and rough that extra bit of length can make a huge bit of difference. We really think that the Fury shows the way forward for DH bike geometry, and if you’re over 6ft tall you really should try one of these bikes out, it’ll be an eye opener. Oh, and this bike just goes to show that you don’t need to make a frame out of carbon in order for it to be a winner.

PRICE: £
CYCLING SPORTS GROUP UK
WWW.GTBICYCLES.COM

Photos by Andy Lloyd – www.alpictures.co.uk

Remember when Dirt&#;s Steve Jones took an exclusive ride on Gee Atherton&#;s very race bike earlier in ? Here&#;s the vid from DirtTV have a look!

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Sours: https://dirtmountainbike.com/dirt/dirtgt-fury-world-cup.html

GT Fury DH Mountain Bike Officially Unveiled – Photos, Details & Geometry

 GT Fury DH mountain bike details and photos with Atherton Racing action pics

According to the video they just released, the current carbon fiber GT Fury started it’s update process as soon as the brand signed Atherton Racing to their roster.

Besides switching to an alloy frame, key changes were in a new, gravity-oriented Independent Drive linkage system and more modern downhill geometry. The headtube goes from 65º to 63º, chainstays shorten to mm, BB drops 20mm lower and the top tube grew by 15mm, allowing for a shorter stem. All that combines with lots of machining and design work to create a metal frame that’s a whopping g lighter than the outgoing carbon Fury, and it’s stiffer.

Drop in for more pics, including a before/after overlay, and the geometry chart…

 GT Fury DH mountain bike details and photos

Bearings are all pushed as wide as possible to keep things stiff. They’re starting with an alloy frame this (next) year so they can tweak and optimize before building the very expensive molds to form carbon fiber frames. And they’ve made it pretty clear that’s the idea…test in alloy first, then make a composite frame.

 GT Fury DH mountain bike details and photos

At the moment, it’s a 26″-only platform, but it’s no secret they’re testing B on other platforms.

 GT Fury DH mountain bike details and photos with old versus new frame comparison

Compared to the carbon one, the Independent Drive linkages are much smaller and overall bottom rotating bits are more compact.

 GT Fury DH mountain bike details and geometry

The geometry, followed by radness.

 GT Fury DH mountain bike details and photos with Atherton Racing action pics

 GT Fury DH mountain bike details and photos with Atherton Racing action pics

The bike made it’s race debut this past weekend at Fort William. And won. Watch it here on demand.

 GT Fury DH mountain bike details and photos with Atherton Racing action pics

 GT Fury DH mountain bike details and photos with Atherton Racing action pics

Sours: https://bikerumor.com//06/10/new-gt-fury-photos-reveal-more-details/
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GT Fury Review

at mm and a Santa Cruz V10 at mm. Top tube measurements only tell part of the story, with reach (the position of the handlebar relative to the bottom bracket) revealing the rest: mm for the medium Session and mm for the V The Fury? A whopping mm. So, it's long, but why? GT's Gee Atherton explains that, ''You can make a mistake and as the front end jumps from under you you've got space to move and correct before you're in that danger zone of your weight being over the front axle.'' The other, more obvious benefit is that having the front end further out there makes for a much more competent feeling bike when pointing down steep sections of trail. The concept isn't new, with Mondraker's ''Forward Geometry'' using the same basic principles, and one or two other manufacturers explored the idea in the past, but the difference is that GT intends the new Fury to be used with a stubby 30mm stem instead of the drastically short 10mm unit that Mondraker uses.

That long front end makes for an equally long wheelbase, with the bike measuring in at mm overall. That is 50mm longer than the Session and 86mm longer than the V10, all despite the new Fury's rear end being 10mm shorter than the old bike. Again, this fact highlights just how long the front of the bike is compared to some of the competition. The bike's bottom bracket height is also quite low, although at mm it isn't the lowest when it comes to production downhill bikes.



Fury Construction Details

There is no carbon to be found on the new Fury frame, with GT choosing to debut an aluminum version of the bike before making the anticipated leap to carbon fiber in the future. Regardless, GT says that the bare frame weighs grams less than the previous carbon version, as well as sporting significantly improved rigidity all around, no doubt a byproduct of the frame's massive aluminum tubing and clever construction. The top tube is large enough in size to look as if it would pass as a down tube on many other bikes, and it drops down sharply from the full length '' head tube while becoming more ovalized as it nears the seat tube. That same theme continues out back, with GT manufacturing a solid looking swingarm that offers a curiously large amount of tire clearance. The bike's 12 x mm axle threads in from the non-drive side, and GT uses pinch bolts on both sides of the swingarm to keep it from shifting in its home.


GT has been clear about their desire to create a chassis that is leaps and bounds stiffer than their previous designs, and they boast about some serious improvements in that department: 26% at the front of the bike and 38% at the bottom bracket. Those are some big numbers, but they are entirely believable given just how burly the frame looks in person. The bike's swingarm uses a massive diameter aluminum pivot axle that turns on equally large sealed bearings, and the swingarm itself is captured within twin spars welded to the down tube and upright junction. The whole arrangement not only looks impressive, it also allows GT to space the main pivot bearings out as widely as possible, adding further stiffness.

The rearward shock mount is also home to a compact linkage, with the shock mounting hardware also acting as the pivot assembly. While it may look like the shock is controlled via the linkage, it is in fact a pair of interconnected links used to arrest lateral movement of the swingarm, without affecting the suspension's action.


The Fury's Independent Drivetrain Suspension Explained

GT has long been known for their I-Drive suspension layout, referred to as 'Independent Drivetrain' on more recent models, that utilizes a ''floating'' bottom bracket unit. This single pivot suspension configuration has been designed to allow for a relatively high main pivot without the drawbacks that are usually associated with it - excessive chain growth. The high pivot helps the bike to swallow up hard, direct impacts thanks to the rearward axle path that it affords, but it is the floating bottom bracket that lets such a design work without the massive chain growth (tugging on the chain as the bike goes through its travel) that would usually be associated with such a layout. GT's Independent Drivetrain does this by letting the bottom bracket move in approximately the same plane as the rear axle by locating it on a separate element that pivots off of the swingarm, all while being attached to the front triangle by a short link, essentially creating a four-bar linkage layout. In the simplest of terms, the bottom bracket moves rearward slightly to mitigate the chain growth of the bike's high pivot. GT's approach has been around for awhile in a few different executions, all having great success on the race circuit, including Gee and Rachel's dominance of the first two World Cup stops of


How is the Fury's Suspension Different From the Old Design?

While both the new Fury shown here and the previous generation may use a similar looking layout, GT has made some very important changes on this latest iteration. The most obvious distinction between the two is the location of the main pivot, with it positioned much lower on the new bike. GT's Etienne Warnery, the engineer behind the new Fury, told us that this gives the bike ''better pedalling performance when you sprint on rough terrain''. How so? The lower pivot should be less affected by chain tension and therefore stay in contact with the ground instead of losing traction due to it firming up. The other major difference is the much shorter length of the dog bone link, the short connecting rod that ties the floating bottom bracket unit to the front triangle. This small piece determines how much the bottom bracket unit moves as the bike goes through its travel, with it having about 10mm of total motion, and that lowering that figure relative to the old bike was an important byproduct of ''having the force coming from the bottom bracket to the swingarm being directed closer to the main pivot in order to remove its consequences,'' Warnery explains. The new pivot location, the much more compact Independent Drivetrain suspension, and the lower shock position in the front triangle all work together to create a lower center of gravity compared to the previous design.





bigquotesWhile the GT may have felt long and unwieldy when sitting on it at a standstill, it comes alive when dropped into the environment it was intended for: steep, fast, and rough trails.

Handling:Sitting on the Fury leaves one wondering if the bike will only perform on big-boy tracks or under riders who hold a pro license, but that isn't the case. Somewhat surprisingly, the long GT feels very practicable and surprisingly agile, but without that flightly personality that can plague a downhill bike with a relatively short wheelbase. Getting the bike around tight corners wasn't an issue whatsoever, so long as the speeds didn't dip down too low or the terrain didn't level out, and we found ourselves actually carrying more momentum through sharp direction changes than on shorter bikes, possibly because the long front end allowed us to move our weight farther forward without feeling as if we were going to high-side if it all went south - much like Gee's description of why he liked the updated geometry. The balance is there as well, especially on loose over hard-pack ground that leaves many bikes searching for traction as one end of the machine gives away before the other - likely an attribute of the Fury's mm/'' overall length and balanced feeling rider-weight distribution. Getting the bike sliding over such ground left us far less panicky than on any other bike we've ridden, with the Fury feeling at ease with a bit of sideways action when it was called for. That stability makes for some seriously fun moments on the trail - squaring off corners with long counter steer slides may not be the fastest way down a trail, but it sure is a hell of a lot of fun aboard the GT.

Quick left to right direction changes didn't take a lot of effort, so long as some momentum was on tap, and we would have guessed that the bike's head angle was slightly steeper than its 63° advertised figure. We mean that last point in a good way, though, because the Fury also manages to remain incredibly composed on the steepest, hairiest of sections. The best of both worlds? It looks to be so. Confidence is the name of the game when it comes to going fast on a downhill track, and we had it in spades when aboard the GT.
bigquotesThe GT's rangy cockpit had us feeling as if it was the first downhill bike that has fit us properly. This view was only cemented by back to back laps on machines with more conventional geometry numbers, with the Fury's roomy front end making those other bikes feel a touch awkward.
We can't recall feeling so comfortable so quickly when hitting jumps aboard a foreign bike that we had barely put any time on, and it took only a few big lips until we were completely confident in the Fury's ability to fly without any unexpected quirks. The suspension setup that we settled on employed slightly slower rebound speeds (read: more controlled) and the result was a bike that didn't have as much ''pop'' as some might prefer, but that is a setup point that boils down to personal preference in the end.

As you might expect, there are drawbacks to the relatively long wheelbase, namely how the bike behaves when speeds fall into the single digits and the corners get ultra-tight. Sure, this could be said of most of the downhill bikes on the market, but the Fury certainly punishes a rider who doesn't carry momentum when speed is the answer. This is obviously not a problem for the Atherton siblings, but putting a real-world, average rider on the GT and asking him or her to thread the gauntlet through turns that ask for lock-to-lock steering won't result in anything pretty. This fact would be a deal breaker for anything but a true downhill race bike, but it can be pardoned given the Fury's intentions. We also continually struggled to bring the front of the bike up in situations that required a manual, with the GT asking its rider to use more body English to do so than other bikes require. It took four full days at Whistler before we could manual the bike with any amount of confidence.



Suspension:With mm of travel and a revised version of GT's Independent Drivetrain, there were many questions to answer about how the Fury would perform on the hill. Would the bike pedal as well as its predecessor, a machine that was renowned for its acceleration? With 20mm more travel than the majority of other downhill bikes on the market, would its suspension simply feel too deep and forgiving? Would wearing the latest One Industries gear and a garage-painted Red Bull helmet while aboard the Fury at Whistler allow us to channel any of Gee's skills? Okay, that last one is a definite no, but the rest deserved looking into.

The Fury offers a deep feel that you'd expect given how much travel it has, even relative to bikes with just 20mm less suspension on hand. That, along with its long wheelbase, allows the big GT to provide a supremely confident ride on serious terrain, especially on hard, medium sized impacts that litter a proper downhill track. It simply always felt as if the bike's Independent Drivetrain suspension had loads of capability at its disposal, with a bottomless and controlled feel to it. And while we began the test with the bike's FOX DHX RC4 shock's blue bottom out adjuster turned half way in, we quickly realized that that wasn't needed, with the design offering more than enough ramp-up for our expert-level skills. We managed to feel only a single hard bottoming moment with the said adjuster turned completely out and the pressure set low, and this came only when coming up so short on a rock to rock gap that we expected to get thrown over the front of the bike. We're relatively sure that making the same mistake on a number of other DH bikes would have seen us get pitched off like we deserved to, but the Fury didn't so much as give us a hint of coming to a stop.


The bike's mid-stroke offers a quite a supportive feel that doesn't leave you wondering where it's sitting in its travel, and we'd go so far as to describe it as lively, not a sensation that we were expecting to feel. In the same breath, the rear wheel gets out of the way in a hurry on chunky terrain with as little fuss as possible. GT's Etienne Warnery, one of the main minds behind the new design, told us that the floating bottom bracket unit moves back roughly 10mm as the bike goes through its travel, and we have to admit to not being able to feel that movement when in action. That's not to say that no one out there will be able to pick it up, just that it is a pretty small amount given that it is happening while the rider is busy concentrating on what is coming up next on the trail. There was also no perceptible firming up when standing, a foible that some riders of the previous design sometimes mentioned.

How well do you expect a downhill bike to pedal? How about one with mm of travel? While we admit that previous trail time on GT's Independent Drivetrain had us expecting class-leading pedalling performance, we were still astounded by just how much ''jump'' the bike had to it when putting some muscle into the pedals. We kicked off testing with a modest amount of low-speed compression set on the bike's FOX shock, but found ourselves backing it out even farther as it became clear that the bike didn't require such a crutch. This left the rear end free to deal with the ground under it rather than the squares that we were turning with the pedals. For a bike as big feeling as it is, the Fury's relatively light lb weight and notably good pedalling gave it quite manageable feeling on tame trails.

The Fury's mm travel Independent Drivetrain did have one peculiarity that we weren't able to tune out, with high-speed chatter seeming to be transmitted through the bike much more than we would have expected. Riding the same sections back to back on two other bikes (a Nukeproof Pulse with a Cane Creek Double Barrel, and a Banshee Legend with a Manitou Revox) showed that they did much better at muting such terrain. The sensation was present regardless of if we were standing or sitting, thereby ruling out any firming up of the Fury's Independent Drivetrain when out of the saddle, and no amount of tinkering with the bike's DHX RC4 shock led to any improvement. We have to wonder if the frame's tremendous lateral rigidity played a part, especially when cornering on such terrain.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesAfter countless runs on both our home mountain and the hairiest terrain that Whistler has to offer, we are positive that GT has hit a home run with their new Fury. And we're not just talking about the bike being for World Cup-level racers, but also for the everyday competitor who doesn't have any illusions of racing in the pro class. The comparatively long front end and wheelbase felt like home after only a few minutes aboard the bike, and we are certain that it had a positive impact on our riding - we not only felt fast, but also comfortable. It has been a long time since we have been this excited about a new aluminum bike with what is essentially a single pivot suspension layout, but the big GT has shot to the top of our short list of preeminent downhill bikes.- Mike Levy


www.gtbicycles.com

Sours: https://www.pinkbike.com/news/gt-fury-tested.html
2014 GT Fury Downhill Mountain Biking - Whistler Bike Park
Noah Bodman reviews the GT Fury Expert, Blister Gear Review.

Bike: GT Fury Expert

Size Tested: Medium

MSRP: $

Bike Weight (as tested w/ g Time Z Pedals): lbs

Geometry: (see page 3)

Build: (see section below)

MSRP (as tested): $

Reviewer Info: 5’ 8” lbs

Days Tested: 6

Test Location: Whistler, BC

Of all the bikes we took on our test trip to Whistler last month, the GT Fury was the one I was most interested in riding. Why? Partly because it’s geometry is fairly different from all the other bikes we rode; partly because there are some interesting things going on with the bike’s rear linkage; and partly because, over the course of my time riding bikes, I’ve watched GT as a company go from the top of the pile to the bottom.

It’s no secret that GT has gone through fits and starts over the years. In the mid 90’s GT was a leader in the sport and made some pretty damn good bikes. But then hard times hit, GT went bankrupt, eventually got bought up by Dorel Industries, and the future of the company was uncertain. GT kept making bikes, though, and their i-drive suspension platform did reasonably well. But as the years wore on, GT’s innovation seemed to lag.

Fast forward to , and enter the newly revised line of Fury DH bikes, a group significantly different from the prior iteration of the Fury, and proven capable by some fast World Cuppers on the GT team.

Gone is the somewhat tall, gangly looking Fury of the past. The new Fury is long, low, and generally massive looking. The essentials of the i-drive system remain (though GT has now lengthened the label to “Independent Drivetrain”), and the linkage is neatly tucked away in a clean package around the frame’s bottom bracket.

Frame Construction & “Independent Drivetrain” Suspension Design

The new Fury is aluminum, which is interesting considering that the older version of the bike was carbon. Yet despite the massive aluminum tubes used on every part of the Fury, the new frame is reportedly significantly lighter than the older carbon version.

What all those huge tubes compose is really a fairly simple single-pivot frame—i.e., there is no linkage between the frame’s front triangle and the rear axle. As the suspension compresses, the rear wheel travels in an un-modified arc around the pivot, slightly above and in front of the bottom bracket. Compared to the old Fury, the new frame’s pivot is substantially lower. While that revised pivot placement might help a bit with pedaling characteristics and slimming down the independent drivetrain linkage, it also makes for a slightly less desirable wheel path, which I’ll discuss below.

Noah Bodman reviews the GT Fury Expert, Blister Gear Review.

The basic premise behind the Independent Drivetrain system is to get the desirable suspension characteristics of a single pivot layout while working around the less desirable pedaling characteristics that usually come along with it.

The pivot placement on most bikes, including the Fury, has the rear wheel traveling in an arc. At the beginning of that arc, the wheel is traveling slightly rearward, which is a good thing when you want the wheel to get out of the way of bumps. But that slightly rearward arc does weird things with your drivetrain; the distance from your chainring in the front to your cassette in the back increases as the suspension compresses, so it will have a tendency to jerk on the chain when you hit an abrupt bump. It also means that when you’re trying to pedal through bumps, the force that you’re putting into the chain is fighting against the suspension movement.

One possible way to address this problem is to move the frame’s pivot very close to the bottom bracket (this is what Trek has done with the suspension design of the Session , for example). This minimizes that rearward portion of the wheel-arc, but it simultaneously negates some of the desirable suspension characteristics that you get with a higher pivot placement.

GT’s solution to this problem, and what their Independent Drivetrain design is all about, is to put the bottom bracket on a little piece of floating linkage so that it may move freely in conjunction with the rear axle. So when you smack a bump and the suspension compresses, the bottom bracket moves with it, roughly mirroring the axle path. The “floating” bottom bracket only moves about 10mm, so I never noticed it shifting, but it did seem to provide some real benefits to how the bike handled, which I’ll get to below.

Fit & Sizing

Before moving on, it’s worth taking a moment to look at how spectacularly long the Fury is. In a size Medium (which I rode), the horizontal top tube is mm (”), the reach is mm (”) and the wheelbase is a massive mm (”). Even as modern bike geometries trend toward longer front ends, those numbers are still pretty unusual.

Compared to a Medium Specialized Demo (the front end of which I’d call average or justslightly on the long side), the reach on the Fury is a modest 8mm longer, but the wheelbase is 39mm (”) longer, and its horizontal top tube is a whopping 77mm (around 3”) longer.

It should also be noted that a medium Fury is the second largest bike in the Fury size run, which goes from Extra Small through Large (rather than Small through Extra Large, like many other companies). So if you’re particularly concerned about the length of the Fury, it might be worth considering sizing down from your normal frame size.

Noah Bodman reviews the GT Fury Expert, Blister Gear Review.

Also contributing to the length of the bike is a 63 degree head angle, greater than any of the other bikes we rode at Whistler and a lot of other modern DH bikes. The Fury’s bottom bracket is relatively low, at mm (”), which is particularly noteworthy since the frame gets mm of travel – a bit more than many other DH bikes that tend to come in around mm.

The one relatively normal measurement on the Fury is the mm (17”) chainstays. They’re longer than the Specialized S-Works Demo 8’s, and just a bit longer than the Trek Session ’s.

With all that said, I felt remarkably comfortable on the size Medium Fury that I rode.

Pages:

Sours: https://blisterreview.com/gear-reviews/gt-fury-expert

Fury 2014 gt

GT Fury Expert

FAQ

Q: How much is a GT Fury Expert?

A GT Fury Expert is typically priced around $4, USD when new. Be sure to shop around for the best price, and also look to the used market for a great deal.

Q: Where to buy a GT Fury Expert?

The GT Fury Expert may be purchased directly from GT.

Q: What size wheels does the GT Fury Expert have?

The GT Fury Expert has 26" wheels.

Q: What size GT Fury Expert should I get?

The GT Fury Expert comes in sizes XS, S, M, L. After measuring your height, use the below size chart to find the correct size GT Fury Expert for your height.

Rider Height (cm)Rider Height (in)Frame Size
cm - cm4'10" - 5'2"XS
cm - cm5'2" - 5'6"S
cm - cm5'6" - 5' 10"M
cm - cm5'10" - 6'1"L
cm - cm6'1" - 6'4"XL
cm - cm6'4" - 6'6"XXL
Sours: https://mtbdatabase.com/bikes//gt/fury/gt-fury-expert/
2014 GT Fury Downhill Mountain Biking - Whistler Bike Park

GT Fury – pricing and spec details

Piloted by Gee and Rachel Atherton, GT’s Fury downhill bike is currently dominating in both the men’s and women’s UCI Downhill World Cup. BikeRadar took a closer look at the range, unveiled last week by UK distributors Cycling Sports Group.

A complete Fury will set you back between £2, and £5, depending on spec. A Fury frameset will also be on offer, retailing at £1, with a Fox DHX RC4 Kashima coated shock. US pricing is to be confirmed.

GT Fury Elite (£2,)

Oli Woodman/Future Publishing

FrameCOR Downhill Design, T6 Alloy Frame, mmTravel Independent Drivetrain™ Suspension Systemw/Forged Linkage, Pivots, ″ Head Tube, and12 x mm Thru Axle Dropouts
ShockFox Racing Shox Van R, ″ x 3″, w/AdjustableRebound
ForkRockShox Domain R Dual Crown, mm Travel,w/Adjustable Rebound and 20 x mm Thru Axle
HeadsetFSA Orbit E R/, ″ to /8″ Reducer, Alloy Cups
StemKore Torsion Direct Mount, ALT6 CNC, 50mm length
HandlebarKore Torsion, Double Butted, mm Width, 20mm Rise, mm Clamp
GripsGT Statement Double Lock-On Grips
Front brakeAvid Code R, mm Rotor
Rear brakeAvid Code R, mm Rotor
Front derailleurNone
Rear derailleurSRAM X5, Medium Cage
ShifterSRAM X5, Trigger, Right Side Only
CassetteSRAM PG, T
ChainKMC X9
CranksetTruvativ Hussefelt , mm, w/36T Ring – e.thirteen LG1 + w/40T Bashguard, steel Boomerang
Bottom bracketTruvativ Howitzer XR, 83mm
PedalsN/A
WheelsetJalco DD30, 32H rims with All Terra Tall Flanged Alloy Sealed Bearing Disc hubs
Front tireContinental Kaiser, Six Ply Casing w/Black ChiliCompound, 26″ x ″
Rear tireContinental Kaiser, Six Ply Casing w/Black ChiliCompound, 26″ x ″
SaddleWTB Silverado Race SL
SeatpostRaceFace Chester

GT Fury Expert (£3,)

GT

FrameCOR Downhill Design, T6 Alloy Frame, mmTravel Independent Drivetrain™ Suspension Systemw/Forged Linkage, Pivots, ″ Head Tube, and12 x mm Thru Axle Dropouts
ShockFox Racing Shox Van RC, ″ x 3″, w/AdjustableRebound and Compression
ForkFox Racing Shox 40R O/B, mm Travel, OpenBath Damper, 20 x mm Thru Axle, w/AdjustableRebound
HeadsetFSA Orbit Z R, ″ to /8″ Reducer, Alloy Cups w/Sealed Bearings
StemKore Torsion Direct Mount, ALT6 CNC, 50mm length
HandlebarsKore Torsion, Double Butted, mm Width, 20mm Rise, mm Clamp
GripsGT Statement Double Lock-On Grips
Front brakeFormula T1s, mm Rotor
Rear brakeFormula T1s, mm Rotor
Front derailleurNone
Rear derailleurShimano Zee Shadow Plus, RD-M, Direct Mount
ShifterShimano Deore, SL-M, Rapid Fire
CassetteShimano CS, Speed, T
ChainKMC X10
CranksetRaceFace Chester, mm, w/36T Ring – e.thirteen LG1 + w/40T Bashguard, steel Boomerang
Bottom bracketRaceFace X-Type, 83mm
PedalsN/A
WheelsetJalco HD, 32H rims with All Terra Tall Flanged Alloy Sealed Bearing Disc hubs
Front tireContinental Kaiser, Six Ply Casing w/Black ChiliCompound, 26″ x ″
Rear tireContinental Kaiser, Six Ply Casing w/Black ChiliCompound, 26″ x ″
SaddleAll Terra Colorado Mg Rail
SeatpostAll Terra AL

GT Fury Team (£4,)

GT

FrameCOR Downhill Design, T6 Alloy Frame, mmTravel Independent Drivetrain™ Suspension Systemw/Forged Linkage, Pivots, ″ Head Tube, and12 x mm Thru Axle Dropouts
ShockFox Racing Shox DHX RC2, ″ x 3″,w/Adjustable Compression and Rebound
ForkFox Racing Shox 40RC2 FIT , mm Travel,FIT damper, 20 xmm Thru Axle, w/AdjustableHigh Speed/Low Speed Compression and Rebound
HeadsetFSA Orbit Z R, ″ to /8″ Reducer, Alloy Cups w/Sealed Bearings
StemRaceFace Atlas Direct Mount, 30/50mm Length
HandlebarsRaceFace Atlas, mm Width, 1/2″ Rise, mm Clamp
GripsGT Statement Double Lock-On Grips
Front brakeShimano Zee, BR-M, w/Metallic Pad, Fins, and SM-RT99 mm Saint Rotor
Rear brakeShimano Zee, BR-M, w/Metallic Pad, Fins, and SM-RT99 mm Saint Rotor
Front derailleurNone
Rear derailleurShimano Saint Shadow Plus, RD-M, DirectMount
ShifterShimano Zee, SL-M, Rapid Fire, Right Side Only
CassetteShimano CS, Speed, T
ChainKMC X10
CranksetShimano Zee, FC-M, mm, w/36T Ring – e.thirteen LG1 + w/40T Bashguard, Alloy Boomerang
Bottom bracketShimano Zee, 83mm
PedalsN/A
WheelsetAlex Supra Compe, Welded, 32H rims with All Terra Tall Flanged Alloy Sealed Bearing Disc hubs
Front tireContinental Der Kaiser Projekt, Six Ply Casingw/Black Chili Compound, 26″ x ″
Rear tireContinental Der Kaiser Projekt, Six Ply Casingw/Black Chili Compound, 26″ x ″
SaddleWTB Silverado Race SL
SeatpostThomson Elite

GT Fury World Cup (£5,)

Oli Woodman/Future Publishing

FrameCOR Downhill Design, T6 Alloy Frame, mmTravel Independent Drivetrain™ Suspension Systemw/Forged Linkage, Pivots, ″ Head Tube, and12 x mm Thru Axle Dropouts
ShockFox Racing Shox DHX RC4 Kashima, ″ x 3″,w/Adjustable High Speed/Low Speed Compression,Rebound, and Bottom-Out
ForkFox Racing Shox 40RC2 FIT Kashima, mm Travel,FIT damper, 20 xmm Thru Axle, w/AdjustableHigh Speed/Low Speed Compression and Rebound
HeadsetFSA Orbit Z R, ″ to /8″ Reducer, Alloy Cups w/Sealed Bearings
StemRaceFace Atlas Direct Mount, 30/50mm Length
HandlebarsPro Atherton DH Riser, mm Width, 15mm Rise, mm Clamp
GripsPro Atherton Lock-On Grip
Front brakeShimano Saint, BR-M, w/Metallic Pad, Fins, and SM-RT86 Rotor
Rear brakeShimano Saint, BR-M, w/Metallic Pad, Fins, and SM-RT86 Rotor
Front derailleurNone
Rear derailleurShimano Saint Shadow Plus, RD-M, DirectMount
ShifterShimano Saint, SL-M, Rapid Fire, Right Side Only
CassetteShimano CS, Speed, T
ChainKMC X10 SL Ti
CranksetShimano Saint, FC-M, mm, w/36T Ring – e.thirteen LG1+ w/40T Bashguard, Alloy Boomerang
Bottom bracketShimano Saint, 83mm
PedalsN/A
Wheelsete.thirteen LG1 +
Front tireContinental Der Kaiser Projekt, Six Ply Casingw/Black Chili Compound, 26″ x ″
Rear tireContinental Der Kaiser Projekt, Six Ply Casingw/Black Chili Compound, 26″ x ″
SaddlePro Atherton Saddle w/Titanium Rails
SeatpostPro Atherton Post

Authors

Now officially part of the furniture, Oli enjoys bicycles of all sorts and has a keen eye for technical detail. An unhealthy interest in older motor vehicles keeps him poor but happy

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